The Northwest Connection

A Community Newspaper for the way we live

Marlon Furtado

We three kings of Orient are;

Bearing gifts, we traverse afar,

Field and fountain, moor and mountain,

Following yonder star.

Refrain:
O star of wonder, star of night,

Star with royal beauty bright,

Westward leading, still proceeding,

Guide us to thy Perfect Light. Continue reading

Grandparents’ joy, Christmas edition

Wayde and I absolutely love being grandparents. Our hearts stop when Jordana and Johnathan reach out their little arms to us, when they cry out, “GiGi…Papa!” I’m constantly taking pictures. I want to record, to remember every moment. They grow up so fast. So, I got our pictures taken for Christmas; it was a beautiful morning. We had gotten up early to make sure we were ready in time, gathering some last-minute items to hopefully hold the babies’ attention so we could obtain that perfect picture. As we pulled up to the tree farm, I could just make out the top of the camper through the trees. I was excited to see the scene that our photographer, Kristi Crawford, had created for this season’s shoot. She did not disappoint us. It gave the feeling of being on a cozy winter holiday, far away from all the complications of life. Continue reading

By Connie Warnock, NW Connection

Ready, set, Merry Christmas!

Another Christmas fast approaches, prompting delightful memories of Christmas long past. Oh, the wonderful traditions that filled our days come December 1st! I was one of two girls, older than my sister, and “full of vinegar!” My memories are numerous. Those days it always snowed! Every Christmas was white. We lived in Northeast Portland on the corner juncture of four streets – Alameda Dr., Mason, 20th, and the hill that led down to Sabin grade school. That hill was long and even turned a corner! The sledding was amazing – for both us kids and our tireless parents.

We all knew each other well – as neighbors did in those days. Television was fairly new and radio was our old standby. Tucked in the breakfast nook, finally home from school, my sister and I could hardly wait for the radio to blare forth with: “And Here’s the Cinnamon Bear!” Half an hour Continue reading

Helen Maguire

Headline from the Daily Mail – December 31, 1914

On a crisp, clear morning 104 years ago, thousands of British, Belgian and French soldiers put down their rifles, stepped out of their trenches, and spent Christmas mingling with their German enemies along the Western front. In the hundred-plus years since, the event has been seen as a kind of miracle, a rare moment of peace just a few months into a war that would eventually claim over 15 million lives.

But what actually happened on Christmas Eve and Christmas Day of 1914? And did they really play soccer on the battlefield?

To this day historians continue to disagree over the specifics: no one knows where it began or how it spread, or if, by some curious festive magic, it broke out simultaneously across the trenches. Nevertheless, some two-thirds of troops — about 100,000 people — are believed to have participated in the legendary truce. Continue reading

Marlon Furtado

Ask people on the street for their opinion about the Bible and you’ll probably hear four very different answers. One response will likely state that the Bible is a good history book but not to be applied to modern life. A second group discounts the veracity of the Bible because it contains accounts of miracles, which puts the Bible in the same category as fairy tales. A third group of people thinks the Bible is only a rule book, giving moral advice that may be unrealistic for today. And a fourth group believes the Bible to be God’s love letter to every person of every generation in every culture. Do any of these responses sound like yours?

If I was asked today, I’d be among this fourth group. But this hasn’t always been the case. Until I was nearly twenty I lived as though the Bible was completely irrelevant to my life. I had absolutely no interest in its content. What changed? One night I heard that after I died, Continue reading

Justus Armstrong

Should the City of Portland invest taxpayer money in local marijuana businesses just because they’re owned by people of color? Prosper Portland seems to think so. Its new grants program seeks to expand minority-owned cannabis businesses in the Portland area.

The Cannabis Business Development Equity Program, funded by a 3% local tax on legal cannabis sales, is intended to address the disproportionate effects of the War on Drugs on people of color. Grants ranging from $5,000 to $30,000 will be administered by the NuLeaf Project and are expected to be awarded to 10-20 businesses. Prospective grant recipients must have at least 51% ownership by people of color to qualify.

Continue reading

Bull market? Bear market? Growth? Uncertainty? What does 2019 have in store?

Economies are described in numbers, percentages, and quarterly comparisons. But the picture is richer than dollar values of production and consumption. No economy exists without millions of unique people bringing to the marketplace their creativity, intelligence, initiative, and effort. The knowledge, skills, and experiences of people are the true wealth of a society. Continue reading

Victoria Larson, N.D.

The cure for frazzle-dazzle?

The holidays bring us so much, in many cases more than we need. Yet each of the winter holidays can deepen the meaning of our lives. We can venture away from the frazzle-dazzle of holidays.

But if you succumb to the frazzle-dazzle of “shop ’til you drop,” treat yourself. If your feet are dog-tired (pun intended) then treat yourself to a soothing footbath as soon as you can get those swollen feet out of those shoes. To refresh worn out tootsie-toes use a handful of fresh herbs, or 1/4 cup of dried if no fresh herbs available. Using a dishpan or large bucket, throw in some salt and water. To refresh feet use any or all of the following: bay leaves (those old ones in the cupboard?), lavender, marjoram, sage, thyme. Add vinegar if your feet itch. Continue reading

On my 63rd birthday I took up bicycle commuting for the sole purpose of reducing gasoline consumption, but the residual advantages just keep coming. Last month I recounted the benefits to my health and improved general attitude, but hardly a week goes by without revealing another unexpected blessing.

Probably the greatest inducement was the circumstance that first suggested the idea: the existence of the Springwater Trail, which extends all the way from the Willamette River to Boring. It runs within two blocks of the place where I work in southeast Portland and ends only two miles from my house, making bicycling in traffic almost unnecessary. Continue reading

Dinesh D’Souza is a bestselling author and filmmaker. His films, 2016: Obama’s America and America: Imagine A World Without Her, are respectively the #2 and #6 highest political documentaries of all time. D’Souza’s latest film, Death Of a Nation builds on this success and takes on progressive big lies, finally proving once and for all that the real party of fascism and racism is now and has always been the Democratic Party.

Born in Mumbai, India, Dinesh has truly lived the American Dream. He moved to the United States to attend school on a Rotary Scholarship. Following Continue reading

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