The Northwest Connection

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The Inspector

The Inspector

Sometimes the arrogance of the Multnomah County Commissioners has no bounds. Case in appoint is Measure 26-183 which would give the commissioners the power to control who is going to be the Sheriff. This way if there is any opposition to what they want they can terminate the Sheriff at will and find another one that will be their sycophant, or lackey. An appointed Sheriff has already been tried from 1967 to 1978 with 6 appointed Sheriff’s and it failed miserably. Why you ask? Simple, when the appointed Sheriff opposed the commissioners they were terminated.

The Multnomah County Sheriff Mike Reese said it best in a recent interview, “You don’t abandon democracy but you try to do better. You want the sheriff to be accountable to the voters not be appointed by elected officials that are looking for someone to do their bidding”.

Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office has over 800 employees, and a $137million dollar budget. They operate corrections, River Patrol, Search and Rescue in short a very complex organization that must have as primary the best interest of the general public. This may be in conflict with the wishes and desires of the county commissioners but that is one of the best reasons to have that position be elected.

Don’t give up your right and privilege to vote for your Sheriff of Multnomah County vote NO Measure 26-183.

 

Matthew near peak strength in the Caribbean Sea on October 1, 2016.

Matthew near peak strength in the Caribbean Sea on October 1, 2016.

Continued hype and deceit drive climate, energy agenda – clobbering poor families

Despite constant claims to the contrary, the issue is not whether greenhouse gas emissions affect Earth’s climate. The questions are whether those emissions are overwhelming the powerful natural forces that have always driven climate fluctuations, and whether humans are causing dangerous climate change.

No Real-World evidence supports a “dangerous manmade climate change” thesis. In fact, a moderately warmer planet with more atmospheric carbon dioxide would hugely benefit crop, forest and other plant growth, wildlife and humans – with no or minimal climate effect. A colder planet with less CO2 would punish them. And a chillier CO2-deprived planet with less reliable, less affordable energy (from massive wind, solar and biofuel projects) would threaten habitats, species, nutrition and the poorest among us.

And yet, as Hurricane Matthew neared Florida on the very day the Paris climate accord secured enough signatures to bring it into force, politicians, activists and reporters refused to let that crisis go to waste. Continue reading

Allison Coleman, Research Associate, Cascade Policy Institute

Allison Coleman, Research Associate, Cascade Policy Institute

 

In 2006, the Metro Council submitted to the voters a general obligation bond measure in the amount of $227.4 million to fund natural area acquisition. The measure was approved.
 
In a little-noticed appendix to Resolution No. 06-367A, the Metro Council stated that greenway lands acquired with bond funds would be land-banked with limited maintenance beyond initial site stabilization and possible habitat restoration. The Council noted that it had the financial means to carry out this promise: Continue reading

John A. Charles, Jr. is President and CEO of Cascade Policy Institute, Oregon’s free market public policy research organization

John A. Charles, Jr. is President and CEO of Cascade Policy Institute, Oregon’s free market public policy research organization

Proponents of Measure 97 have consistently claimed that if the measure passes, it will generate an additional $3 billion annually for public education and other social services. Judging from the comments I’ve read in various Oregon newspapers, many people are falling for this argument.

Apparently none of the letter writers have ever watched a legislative appropriations hearing. These are the meetings where a tiny group of senior politicians sit in a back room and decide how to spend billions of dollars. I’ve watched hundreds of such hearings, and the most predictable outcome is that politicians will spend money in front of them on whatever they want.

Let’s just take a simple example. Oregon was one of 44 states that sued the tobacco industry in the mid-1990s to recover the health care costs associated with smoking. Plaintiffs claimed that the tobacco industry had long been imposing uncompensated costs on states in the form of health care for smokers who became sick from use of the product.

The suit was settled through adoption of a Master Settlement Agreement (MSA) with the four largest tobacco manufacturers. As part of the agreement, each state was to receive payments every year from 1998 through 2025. Continue reading

constrainable_envelopment_by-john-pritchett

Frank Maguire, The Northwest Connection

Frank Maguire, The Northwest Connection

The New York Times alleges (from Renew America.com 10/3/2016) that “Donald Trump may have legally avoided paying federal income taxes for as long as 18 years because of a $916 million loss he declared on his 1995 tax returns from his failed business dealings… .”

What can we assume from this allegation? We can assume that Trump filed income tax returns for every year from 1995 to the present. We can assume that IRS agents scrutinized his returns. We can assume that the IRS found that Trump’s claimed losses declared on his 1995 returns were legitimate. And we can assume that by the laws of the IRS it was perfectly legal how Trump’s losses were determined, and how Trump’s accountants met all the legal requirements.

Finally, then! We can assume that Trump is not guilty of any illegalities subtly implied by the New York Times…and that the Times innuendo is entirely politically motivated.

So, what else is news. An analogy: Black Bears make a mess by invading the garbage cans in camping sites. The why of this is very simple. Black Bears do what it is natural for them to do. Juxtaposing this analogy to the New York Times, the Times is only doing what the Times does naturally. Continue reading

Dr.s Bud and Selma Pierce

Dr.s Bud and Selma Pierce

Dr. Bud Pierce, Candidate for Governor

Dr. Bud Pierce, Candidate for Governor

For a number of years, I have tried to provide our politicians or would-be politicians with solid scientific information on the climate controversy to enable them to talk about the science of climate intelligently. A few are already well-informed, like Republican State Senator Doug Whitsett, a veterinarian from Southern Oregon. Others are receptive and generally aware that the paradigm of rising atmospheric CO2 driving rapidly rising temperatures is false and being greatly misused for corrupt politics. Those who will listen are almost entirely Republicans. Democrats want nothing to do with credentialed scientists whom they call “deniers” and “flat-earthers.” Portland Commissioner Nick Fish, a Democrat, looked at me like I had some sort of disease that he might catch if he continued to talk with me after a city council meeting. His demeanor was hilarious. Continue reading

John Ludlow, Chair of the Clackamas County Board of Commissioners

John Ludlow, Chair of the Clackamas County Board of Commissioners

As Clackamas County Chair, I have grown increasingly disappointed with other regional government leaders prioritizing billions in light rail mass transit over fixing the traffic congestion problems that our county residents are so frustrated with. Worsening traffic congestion affects not only Clackamas County’s businesses but our residents who commute in and out of the county every day. We can no longer ignore this problem.

Clackamas County’s own 5.9 mile portion of Interstate 205 is a choke point for the region, as well as an intrastate and interstate concern. It has been declared by the Federal government to be a “High Priority Corridor,” but solutions have yet to be funded.

There are three major, regional traffic choke points that have been identified: I-205, Hwy 217, and the I-5/I-84 Rose Quarter. The preliminary estimate to fix all three of these bottlenecks is approximately $1.4 Billion. Keep this figure in mind while I tell you about Trimet’s plan for the Southwest Corridor. Continue reading

notaxformax540Dear NW Connection Readers,

Art Crino

By Art Crino

Our team over here in Tigard have quite a battle on our hands.
“TriMet GM Neil McFarlane said regional transportation planners will stop working on the project if Tigard voters reject it in their city.”
Our hope is that more people will recognize the significance and opportunity with the Tigard vote.
This Tigard vote can stop a $3 billion boondoggle and also strike a fatal blow to the ruinous agenda that has caused our housing crisis and worsening congestion.
Clear back in 1997 a network of light rail with high density development was adopted as the regional response to SB 100 and the Urban Growth Boundary that has artificially constrained our land supply. Continue reading

By Connie Warnock, The Northwest Connection

By Connie Warnock, The Northwest Connection

Yesterday, I was asked who I was voting for, and when I replied “Trump” he said, “really?” “Really,” I replied. “Why,” he asked, “do you really think Trump can be a good president?”

Here, word for word is my answer:

Yes, I believe he will make a great President. For starters, he is a self-made man and does not have to prove his success in the private sector. He’s very smart (savvy) and did not get where he is without listening to and observing men already successful in their fields. I believe him to be sincerely sensitive to those less fortunate American citizens. Continue reading

Steve Bates

Steve Bates

Time and again we hear stories about Veterans that are not receiving the benefits that are rightfully theirs. As the general public is made aware of these people and their needs, there is always the question; What can I do?
Measure 96 presents every voting Oregonian the opportunity to help the Veterans and the Veterans Organizations that serve them.
What can I do? Vote YES on Measure 96. Continue reading

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