The Northwest Connection

A Community Newspaper for the way we live

By Marlon Furtado, Associate Pastor, Greater Gresham Baptist Church

By Marlon Furtado, Associate Pastor, Greater Gresham Baptist Church

This was the BEST day of my life.
It started months ago
First, a light touch
Then whispers of my beauty
Then talks of how unhappy he was in his marriage
It finally happened…We snuck away and went to bed…
After our lovemaking I drifted into a peaceful sleep…
Suddenly, this became the WORST day of my life.
I was awakened by… angry voices… voices inside the house…
The door burst open and the room swarmed with angry men. Continue reading

This dog speaks Dutch and a little English too. He is uber alert and misses nothing. Even the suspects know better than try to outrun a dog that can do 20 to 30 miles in short spurts.

This dog speaks Dutch and a little English too. He is uber alert and misses nothing. Even the suspects know better than try to outrun a dog that can do 20 to 30 miles in short spurts.

By Jim Kight, NW Connection

By Jim Kight, NW Connection

Multnomah County Deputy Todd Weber remembers the night as if it had just happened. He can provide remarkable details from that event thirteen years ago. He made a traffic stop at 2:30 a.m. He did a background check based on the license plate of the car. Immediately the passenger opened the door and made a run for it. The male passenger had an outstanding warrant which is plenty of reason for him to bolt from the car. Along Deputy Weber immediately called for backup since the driver was still in the car. What came next as part of his call for backup was to change his professional career. An officer showed up with a K-9 and within minutes the Drago had the passenger cornered. Although not visible to the deputies the criminal was hidden only two yards away.

After that demonstration Deputy Weber made a decision that he wanted to be a K-9 Officer. Early on the County decided to raise their K-9 dogs from pups. That attempt failed for Deputy Weber but he was not easily discouraged. His current K-9 German Shepherd, who is five years old, comes from the Netherlands. Rangers’ commands are in Dutch although he appears to be bilingual and understands some English words. The dogs like their deputies are highly trained and spend hundreds of hours in training with other K-9 units from other agencies. For master trainers they will spend 400 hours, 10 weeks in a row. Each dog is valued at between $9 and $10,000. The dog’s personalities are matched to that of the deputies. Continue reading

Kathryn Hickok

By Kathryn Hickok,  Cascade Policy Institute

Your average high school students may not be able to explain a fictional company’s dividends to a lecture hall full of adults from the business world. But after five days at Young Entrepreneurs Business Week, they could.

Students receive instruction on their business simulation (BizSim)

Students receive instruction on their business simulation (BizSim)

YEBW is a nonprofit annual summer camp founded in 2005 by young Oregon entrepreneurs Nick and Maurissa Fisher, hosted on the campuses of the University of Portland, Oregon State University, and University of Oregon. From 75 students on one campus during its first year, YEBW has grown to more than 400 participants on three campuses in 2016.

YEBW’s founders shared a concern that young people of all educational and economic backgrounds often leave high school with no practical business knowledge, hindering their ability to innovate, create, and produce the kinds of goods and services key to Oregon communities’ growth and success. They sought to fill the gap by drawing together curriculum developers, business professionals, educators, and successful youth-focused program leaders to launch an innovative educational program for high school students. Continue reading

bamboo

Mark Ellis, The Northwest Connection, Assistant Editor

Mark Ellis, The Northwest Connection, Assistant Editor

Many Portlandians worry more about invasive plants than they do about undocumented immigrants. My yard is overrun with invasive plants. Since I never plant anything, this state of affairs is not entirely my fault. Somehow the invasives just got here. I have no doubt that their ancestors have lived here since before I was born.

But it certainly has gotten worse since I purchased the 1926 cottage in 1999.

My yard is not politically correct. With Oregon’s climate working against me–months of replenishing rain followed by a temperate summer season—the fallow winter yields to a spring onslaught of every non-indigenous chlorophyllian spawn that can cross a lot or be carried on the wind.

I’ve had estimates of three-to-five thousand dollars to remedy the situation. To whack everything down, uproot the roots, chemicals as needed, and start from square one. Some other expenditure always rises in priority. See, I like my politically incorrect yard, a mutant green and occasionally flowering jungle that looks the way something looks when nature, good and bad, takes over. Continue reading

Dale Robertson, 1923-2013

Dale Robertson, 1923-2013

Dale Robertson, the actor who made his name in television Westerns in the 1950s and ’60s, was born on July 14, 1923, in Harrah, Oklahoma, to Melvin and Varval Robertson. At the age of 17 while attending Oklahoma Military College he boxed in professional prize fights to earn money. In his junior year he was declared “ineligible” to play sports because of two professional boxing matches he had previously fought. As a result, he decided to enroll in the Oklahoma Military Academy in the city of Claremore where he was permitted to participate in sports. Dale went on to be nominated “All-Around Athlete” while attending the Academy.

Harry Cohn approached him after a fight in Wichita, Kansas and asked him to come out to Hollywood to play the role of Joe Bonaparte in a boxing picture called “Golden Boy.” Robertson declined, saying he was in the middle of training 17 polo ponies, and could not leave his family at his age. (William Holden eventually was cast in the Golden Boy (1939) role.) Continue reading

Paul Driessen is senior policy analyst for the Committee For A Constructive Tomorrow and a veteran of anti-malaria campaigns

Paul Driessen is senior policy analyst for the Committee For A Constructive Tomorrow and author of Eco-Imperialism: Green power-Black death

It was wrong to interrupt Rio’s delightful opening ceremonies with deceitful agitprop

XXXI Olympiad competitors are joyfully showcasing their skills and sportsmanship, while delighted fans revel in their amazing efforts. But opening ceremonies featuring colorful history, dance, song and athletes were rudely interrupted by an unprecedented propaganda film.

As audiences around the world were getting pumped up in eager anticipation for the upcoming events, a slick but deceitful video soured the mood by inserting partisan climate change politics.

Fossil fuels are warming our planet, and the manmade heat is melting its ice caps, narrators intoned. Animated maps showed Greenland “disappearing very quickly” and Amsterdam, Dubai, Miami, Shanghai, Lagos and Rio being swallowed up by rising seas. Continue reading

Hot topic: AR-15 basics

Hot topic: AR-15 basics

Last month, I supplied foundational evidence for the fact there is no such thing as an assault weapon. So now that we are clear on that, what exactly is an AR-15? This will not be an exhaustive explanation, any details you may want to know would best be found at a local gun shop, or through a firearms expert. Information found online can be confusing, inaccurate, and/or inconsistent. Rather, this is just some basic information for you to have and share since gun control is the hot topic of the moment and doesn‘t appear to be fading from public interest any time soon.

I visited a local gun shop so I could understand firsthand and with the help of an expert, what an AR-15 is. (The owner of the gun shop was invaluable for his patience and help in completing this article.) First, everyone is generalizing military style semi-automatic rifles by the nomenclature “AR-15.” Continue reading

Rich Allen, Troutdale City Councilor

Rich Allen, Troutdale City Councilor

I read a flyer the other day for one of the regional candidates. It talked about values we could all agree with. Then it dawned on me that the person pictured on the flyer was working with the very people that have violated everything I believe in, and that my fellow service people have died for—a republic that represents the people with liberty and justice for all. These aren’t dead words. They actually mean something, and soldiers have been willing to give their lives for the ideals our nation has been founded on.

All too often politicians hire campaign managers and implement polls to find out what we want to hear, then once in office they cater to the people that can help them win the next election. At least twice I have endorsed people that later proved that they couldn’t live up to their campaign promises. It was just too tempting for them to support benefactors instead of us. If you feel like you aren’t represented, you are right. The average person doesn’t attend meetings, or know who is representing them. Certainly there is nothing a good spin can’t take care of. Politicians know it takes money to win an election, and the best contributors are people who make money from their decisions, or the people who have a special interest they want to impose on us. Hence, the folly of our system. Continue reading

bagpiperOn Tuesday, August 9, 2016, the Boring, Oregon Foundation will host the Fourth Annual Boring & Dull Day Community Social In The Park.

In conjunction with four other non-profit organizations, this event is described as an ice cream social. Free Ice Cream for all will be served by volunteers from the Boring Oregon Foundation, Hollyview Family Church, Sandy Veterans of Foreign Wars, and the Country Cutups Square Dance Club from Boring.

The Boring-Damascus Grange will have food for purchase at the south end of the park.

There will be live entertainment which will include Scottish Highland music by a Pipes & Drum ensemble followed by the music of Ron Ruedi and the Hurricanes.

The event starts at 5pm on Tuesday, August 9th and will be held at the Boring Station Trailhead Park.

Steve Bates

Steve Bates

In a recent Guest Editorial, a sitting Clackamas County Commissioner inferred that it was disingenuous to pursue benefits from property ownership and to attempt to increase the value of one’s property.

How can that be disingenuous?

Is it not the crux of the American Dream to strive to improve one’s standing?

To work to improve one’s finances? Continue reading

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