The Northwest Connection

A Community Newspaper for the way we live

Kathryn Hickok

By Kathryn Hickok, Publications Director, Cascade Policy Institute

By Steve Buckstein, Senior Policy Analyst, Cascade Policy Institute

By Steve Buckstein, Senior Policy Analyst, Cascade Policy Institute

Last month, National Employee Freedom Week (August 14-20, 2016) called attention to the rights of union members to opt out of union membership if they choose and to stop paying dues and fees to unions they do not support. National Employee Freedom Week has conducted surveys of union members and households. One of this year’s significant findings is that a strong majority of union members nationwide agree that if members opt out of paying union dues and fees, they should represent themselves in negotiations with employers. Continue reading

Clackamas County Commission Chair John Ludlow

Clackamas County Commission Chair John Ludlow

As I campaign for re-election, I occasionally hear about how some folks misrepresented the disagreements between Clackamas County and Metro. My opponents were not helping as they would have voters falsely presume our county commission just can’t get along with the regional government.
To give you a clearer picture…
No one at Metro has been or is representing Clackamas County interests…not with land use, transportation planning, or growth management.
The reality is our regional planners and Metro councilors have hurt our county.
On land use, it all comes down to how Metro has purposefully over-restricted the county’s buildable land supply for housing, industry, and jobs. Continue reading

Honeybee02Now wild bee junk science and scare stories drive demands for anti-pesticide regulations.

As stubborn facts ruin their narrative that neonicotinoid pesticides are causing a honeybee-pocalypse, environmental pressure groups are shifting to new scares to justify their demands for “neonic” bans.

Honeybee populations and colony numbers in the United States, Canada, Europe, Australia and elsewhere are growing. It is also becoming increasingly clear that the actual cause of bee die-offs and “colony collapse disorders” is not neonics, but a toxic mix of predatory mites, stomach fungi, other microscopic pests, and assorted chemicals employed by beekeepers trying to control the beehive infestations. Continue reading

Rich Allen, Troutdale City Councilor

Rich Allen, Troutdale City Councilor

I attended the West Columbia Gorge Chamber of Commerce board meeting on Monday, August 15th.  I saw candidate Tamie Tlustos–Arnold appear to do the bidding of a few key people who are financially supporting her election bid for state senate over what I would consider to be the best interests of the residents and business community of Troutdale. Along with candidate John Wilson who is seeking reelection to the Troutdale City Council, and Matt Wand, who is the general counsel for Eastwinds Development LLC and Eastwinds key negotiator for Troutdale urban renewal, they were encouraging the creation of a Government Affairs Committee that amongst other duties will suggest candidate endorsements for the upcoming general election. If confirmed by the chamber board, then a PAC of a similar name made up of some of the same people including Matt Wand and former Troutdale City Councilor Eric Anderson may fund the endorsed candidates.

Earlier, when like-minded people controlled the city council, Councilors Larry Morgan, John Wilson, Eric Anderson, and Mayor Doug Daoust passed a letter of intent for a future deal involving the sale of 12 city-owned commercial acres east of the factory outlet mall with a northern portion along the Sandy River. The adjacent outlet mall recently sold for over $28 million, but the deal considers the city property to only be worth $1.5 million even though it was appraised for $6 million, according to the Gresham Outlook article titled “Troutdale gives Eastwind the green light” dated February 19th, 2016. This deal has a contingency for a condemnation of private property and a road through the middle of the outlet mall at an unknown expense to the city somewhere in the millions. Continue reading

DahliaDahlstarSunsetPinkThe Dahlia:  Daisy Family Compositae

KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERADahlia is a genus of bushy, summer–and autumn–flowering, tuberous perennial plants native to Mexico, where they are the national flower. The Aztecs gathered and cultivated the dahlia for food, ceremony as well as decorative purposes [1], and the long woody stem of one variety was used for small pipes.

In 1872 a box of Dahlia roots were sent from Mexico to the Netherlands. Only one plant survived the trip, but produced spectacular red flowers with pointed petals. Nurserymen in Europe bred from this plant, which was named Dahlia juarezii with parents of Dahlias discovered earlier and these are the progenitors of all modern Dahlia hybrids. Continue reading

Paula Olson, The Northwest Connection

Paula Olson, The Northwest Connection

Recently my family and I drove to Mount Rainier for a long weekend of camping, and a long weekend of camping grime and dirty fingernails – it goes with the territory. The weather smiled upon us and the mountain proved itself as spectacular as ever. We encountered a lot of snow low on the mountain near Paradise which made for slippery, short-lived hikes with a seven-year-old and his ill-prepared parents, but it was nevertheless beautiful. Other trails at lower elevations were a delight to explore.
We stayed at a campground where wood smoke filtered through tall evergreen trees in the evening and the smell of camp food occasionally wafted through our area. All of this stirred my memories of hitting various campgrounds, mostly around Oregon, as a child with my family. And while there is nothing quite like snuggling up with your parents or siblings in a tent when you are a kid, there is also something magical about going to summer camp without the parental units around. Continue reading

indian1Do you know the legend of the Cherokee Indian youth’s rite of Passage?
His father takes him into the forest, blindfolds him and leaves him alone. He is required to sit on a stump the whole night and not remove the blindfold until the rays of the morning sun shine through it. He cannot cry out for help to anyone.boyindian
Once he survives the night, he is a MAN.
He cannot tell the other boys of this experience, because each lad must come into manhood on his own.
The boy is naturally terrified. He can hear all kinds of noises. Wild beasts must surely be all around him . Maybe even some human might do him harm. The wind blew the grass and earth, and shook his stump, but he sat stoically, never removing the blindfold. It would be the only way he could become a man! Continue reading

The hummingbird, our fascinating backyard friend

The hummingbird, our fascinating backyard friend

You know that startled feeling you get when a bee buzzes right past your ear or a mosquito appears out of nowhere and hums its gonna-getcha song before it lays in for the puncture? Those sounds can make you swat madly at the air, shake your head violently, and duck and cover with futility. Last week, as I hunched over the backyard garden beds digging out Japanese clover and the random tarragon that reseeded, I nearly jumped out of my skin from a loud vibration and whirring near my head. But contrary to the “yikes” feeling an insect stirs in me, this little engine sound delighted me. It came from an Anna’s hummingbird. Continue reading

waterfallinwoods

Pastor Bill Ehmann, Wood Village Baptist Church

Pastor Bill Ehmann, Wood Village Baptist Church

As Carol and I traveled the Interstate Highway recently through Idaho, Utah and Wyoming, we talked about the pioneers who came through this area many years ago. So many things have changed. We covered more miles in an hour than they did in a week. Our ride was on smooth roads in a comfortable car with air conditioning. Theirs was in a wagon – much of the time walking – over dusty prairies.

My mind cannot grasp the reality of what those brave people endured. There is no comparison between what they experienced and what we enjoyed. I am quick to admit that I am not the kind of person it would take to do what they did, and I am humbly grateful for their efforts. What we enjoy today in the Pacific Northwest is the result of what they did. Continue reading

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