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Family/Health

Family/Health

Bryan Fischer

Bryan Fischer

Socialism is, and always will, be a colossal failure. This is for the simple reason that even the best of men eventually grow tired of getting ripped off. An entire economy based on theft – even legalized theft – cannot possibly work.

We’re always told that the only reason socialism has never worked is that the right people haven’t been in charge. Well, if there were ever a group of men who were the right people to put in charge of an experiment in socialism, it was our Pilgrim forebears.

They were godly, steeped in Scripture, and pure in motive. As Governor Bradford said, these were “good and honest men.” In fact, the entire purpose of their relocation to the New World was for “the glory of God and the advancement of the Christian faith.” (Yes, America was founded as a Christian nation.) Continue reading

By Jim Kight, NW Connection

By Jim Kight, NW Connection

Justice Reinvestment Program: Stopping recidivism in its tracks

Justice Reinvestment Program: Stopping recidivism in its tracks

We are approaching the holiday season when friends and family will be staying at our homes. This is a great time to renew old acquaintances and have dinners and parties with the ones we love. However one group of folks that isn’t looking forward to you coming to where they work is the staff at the Multnomah County Jail.

They have a program for those that choose not to come back and are seeking a changed life. For a plethora of reasons some former inmates have gotten off track and turned to a life of crime. In their heart they know this is a dead-end; but lack the skills and knowledge to turn their lives around. Enter the Multnomah County Justice Reinvestment Program and the Inverness Jail Alcohol and Drug Pre-Treatment Unit. Continue reading

By Connie Warnock, The Northwest Connection

By Connie Warnock, The Northwest Connection

When I left you with Part One, I had refused to accept the pills prescribed by my doctor for my cholesterol and blood pressure. Hubby and I were planning to show dogs in Washington. The motorhome was packed, including a banana cream pie and cinnamon rolls with mile-high cream cheese frosting. Arriving home, I took out the pie and the cinnamon rolls. I had thrown down the gauntlet so-to-speak, and now I had to make good.

That weekend I ate sparingly. And, each evening I walked all around the show grounds. We arrived home Sunday and I whipped up soup and half of a peanut butter sandwich. Monday morning, I didn’t make my customary trip to Starbucks. Instead, I ate a large bowl of Honey Nut Cherrios. Tuesday, I added blue berries to the Cheerios! I didn’t waste time wondering what to cook. Instead, I became a tweaker…for every calorie-laden meal I had ever cooked, there was a way to get around it. My “treat” became a small bite of 72% dark chocolate. I discovered when eating out, I could make smart choices, or splurge, and only eat a few bites. It became a game. Continue reading

By Connie Warnock, The Northwest Connection

By Connie Warnock, The Northwest Connection

Yesterday, I was asked who I was voting for, and when I replied “Trump” he said, “really?” “Really,” I replied. “Why,” he asked, “do you really think Trump can be a good president?”

Here, word for word is my answer:

Yes, I believe he will make a great President. For starters, he is a self-made man and does not have to prove his success in the private sector. He’s very smart (savvy) and did not get where he is without listening to and observing men already successful in their fields. I believe him to be sincerely sensitive to those less fortunate American citizens. Continue reading

Victoria Woodhull

Victoria Woodhull

Based on the rhetoric surrounding her historic candidacy in 2008 and, in more recent months, leading up to the 2016 campaign, you’d be forgiven for thinking that Hillary Clinton was the first woman ever to run for the nation’s highest office. Far from it.

Few know, though, the name of the woman who challenged the highest glass ceiling. That honor belongs to a colorful and convention-defying woman named Victoria Woodhull, a spiritualist, activist, politician, and author, who ran for the office in 1872, 136 years before Clinton made her first run in 2008. Continue reading

Lori Porter

Lori Porter, Parent Rights In Education

On August 22, 2016, United States District Judge Reed O’Connor issued a nationwide preliminary injunction which blocked the Obama administration’s Title IX “Guidelines.”

This federal case (U.S District Court, Northern District of Texas, Wichita Falls Division Preliminary Injunction Order: State of Texas v. United States of America et al ) included twelve other states and two school districts suing the U.S. DOE, DOJ, EEOC and DOL. Additional states have since joined, making a total of 23 states involved in this case. This Order allows school districts around the country the ability to maintain: “[T]he status quo as of the date of issuance of this Order and this preliminary injunction will remain in effect until the Court rules on the merits of this claim, or until further direction from the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals.” Continue reading

DahliaDahlstarSunsetPinkThe Dahlia:  Daisy Family Compositae

KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERADahlia is a genus of bushy, summer–and autumn–flowering, tuberous perennial plants native to Mexico, where they are the national flower. The Aztecs gathered and cultivated the dahlia for food, ceremony as well as decorative purposes [1], and the long woody stem of one variety was used for small pipes.

In 1872 a box of Dahlia roots were sent from Mexico to the Netherlands. Only one plant survived the trip, but produced spectacular red flowers with pointed petals. Nurserymen in Europe bred from this plant, which was named Dahlia juarezii with parents of Dahlias discovered earlier and these are the progenitors of all modern Dahlia hybrids. Continue reading

Paula Olson, The Northwest Connection

Paula Olson, The Northwest Connection

Recently my family and I drove to Mount Rainier for a long weekend of camping, and a long weekend of camping grime and dirty fingernails – it goes with the territory. The weather smiled upon us and the mountain proved itself as spectacular as ever. We encountered a lot of snow low on the mountain near Paradise which made for slippery, short-lived hikes with a seven-year-old and his ill-prepared parents, but it was nevertheless beautiful. Other trails at lower elevations were a delight to explore.
We stayed at a campground where wood smoke filtered through tall evergreen trees in the evening and the smell of camp food occasionally wafted through our area. All of this stirred my memories of hitting various campgrounds, mostly around Oregon, as a child with my family. And while there is nothing quite like snuggling up with your parents or siblings in a tent when you are a kid, there is also something magical about going to summer camp without the parental units around. Continue reading

bamboo

Mark Ellis, The Northwest Connection, Assistant Editor

Mark Ellis, The Northwest Connection, Assistant Editor

Many Portlandians worry more about invasive plants than they do about undocumented immigrants. My yard is overrun with invasive plants. Since I never plant anything, this state of affairs is not entirely my fault. Somehow the invasives just got here. I have no doubt that their ancestors have lived here since before I was born.

But it certainly has gotten worse since I purchased the 1926 cottage in 1999.

My yard is not politically correct. With Oregon’s climate working against me–months of replenishing rain followed by a temperate summer season—the fallow winter yields to a spring onslaught of every non-indigenous chlorophyllian spawn that can cross a lot or be carried on the wind.

I’ve had estimates of three-to-five thousand dollars to remedy the situation. To whack everything down, uproot the roots, chemicals as needed, and start from square one. Some other expenditure always rises in priority. See, I like my politically incorrect yard, a mutant green and occasionally flowering jungle that looks the way something looks when nature, good and bad, takes over. Continue reading

Dale Robertson, 1923-2013

Dale Robertson, 1923-2013

Dale Robertson, the actor who made his name in television Westerns in the 1950s and ’60s, was born on July 14, 1923, in Harrah, Oklahoma, to Melvin and Varval Robertson. At the age of 17 while attending Oklahoma Military College he boxed in professional prize fights to earn money. In his junior year he was declared “ineligible” to play sports because of two professional boxing matches he had previously fought. As a result, he decided to enroll in the Oklahoma Military Academy in the city of Claremore where he was permitted to participate in sports. Dale went on to be nominated “All-Around Athlete” while attending the Academy.

Harry Cohn approached him after a fight in Wichita, Kansas and asked him to come out to Hollywood to play the role of Joe Bonaparte in a boxing picture called “Golden Boy.” Robertson declined, saying he was in the middle of training 17 polo ponies, and could not leave his family at his age. (William Holden eventually was cast in the Golden Boy (1939) role.) Continue reading

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