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Family/Health

Family/Health

As soon as we get past January 1st, I start to feel impatient. It’s the time of year I start planning what to grow in my quest for the most perfect Homemade Salsa. Every year, I try several new varieties to find the most flavorful tomatoes, the freshest tasting herbs, and the sweetest corn. Most unusual varieties have to be grown from seed. If you want to join me on my quest, I’ll give you a few of my greatest Secrets to growing great Salsa Ingredients from seed.

Use Good Seed Growing Trays. I prefer the little trays you can purchase at Bi-Mart that have the clear covers to help hold in moisture. I have used the jiffy pellets with good results. You get them wet and they swell up into a little round dirt pots, ready to grow. One of the things I love about them is that you plant the entire thing with absolutely no mess. If money is an issue, you can also use paper egg cartons in plastic vegetable bags. I start most everything inside in those little pots, it really helps improve germination and stop birds and things from digging up and eating the seeds. Continue reading

Paula Olson, The Northwest Connection

It’s already March. How are you doing on your New Year’s resolutions? A friend of mine has latched onto Chinese New Year because she says it’s sort of like a “re-do” opportunity if you don’t stick to your calendar year resolutions. Chinese New Year usually falls at the end of January or early February and this, the year of the dragon, was no exception. So, about three weeks after 2017 started, some of us said, “Well, let’s be serious about it now.” Have I gotten down to the business of carrying out my resolutions?

Not so much. I remember giving up a few years ago after trying to explain resolutions to my son. He resolved to go swimming with his parents during open swim (read: play time for kids and families) twice a week at the Y. That was actually more of a wish to lock the parents into a commitment they can’t keep due to scheduling, sports games, and other various obstacles. But it sounded good to him. Continue reading

Paula Olson

They have as much fun with the box as they do with the toy that came in it! If you have been around toddlers at a birthday party then you know it is true. That’s not much consolation to friends or relatives who poured valuable time and deep thought into finding the perfect gift for the child, but they can always consider it as two gifts in one, right? By using your own ingenuity and letting your children use their creativity, you can find plenty of inexpensive ways to entertain ages from the toddler crowd all the way up through grade school. Extending the life of a piece of cardboard destined for the recycler is one way. Here is a hefty list of ideas to get you started, inside or outside the box. Continue reading

There are some reliable natural cleaners on the market that have been available for years in co-ops and now there is a new slew of household cleaners on store shelves in the likes of Target and Fred Meyer. They claim to be “green,” but, wait a minute – Clorox® and “natural” on the same label? Continue reading

Helen Maguire

Chicago lawyer, Horatio G. Spafford

In our small community here, in Arizona City, my husband Frank and I actively participate in our non-denominational worship services each Sunday. Frank assists with providing music and I contribute by putting the applicable hymn lyrics up on a large TV Screen. Recently, I had the opportunity to do a bit of research about one of our favorite hymns: “It is well with my soul.” In this month’s article, I’m sharing a bit of what I learned. Continue reading

Bryan Fischer

Bryan Fischer

Socialism is, and always will, be a colossal failure. This is for the simple reason that even the best of men eventually grow tired of getting ripped off. An entire economy based on theft – even legalized theft – cannot possibly work.

We’re always told that the only reason socialism has never worked is that the right people haven’t been in charge. Well, if there were ever a group of men who were the right people to put in charge of an experiment in socialism, it was our Pilgrim forebears.

They were godly, steeped in Scripture, and pure in motive. As Governor Bradford said, these were “good and honest men.” In fact, the entire purpose of their relocation to the New World was for “the glory of God and the advancement of the Christian faith.” (Yes, America was founded as a Christian nation.) Continue reading

By Jim Kight, NW Connection

By Jim Kight, NW Connection

Justice Reinvestment Program: Stopping recidivism in its tracks

Justice Reinvestment Program: Stopping recidivism in its tracks

We are approaching the holiday season when friends and family will be staying at our homes. This is a great time to renew old acquaintances and have dinners and parties with the ones we love. However one group of folks that isn’t looking forward to you coming to where they work is the staff at the Multnomah County Jail.

They have a program for those that choose not to come back and are seeking a changed life. For a plethora of reasons some former inmates have gotten off track and turned to a life of crime. In their heart they know this is a dead-end; but lack the skills and knowledge to turn their lives around. Enter the Multnomah County Justice Reinvestment Program and the Inverness Jail Alcohol and Drug Pre-Treatment Unit. Continue reading

By Connie Warnock, The Northwest Connection

By Connie Warnock, The Northwest Connection

When I left you with Part One, I had refused to accept the pills prescribed by my doctor for my cholesterol and blood pressure. Hubby and I were planning to show dogs in Washington. The motorhome was packed, including a banana cream pie and cinnamon rolls with mile-high cream cheese frosting. Arriving home, I took out the pie and the cinnamon rolls. I had thrown down the gauntlet so-to-speak, and now I had to make good.

That weekend I ate sparingly. And, each evening I walked all around the show grounds. We arrived home Sunday and I whipped up soup and half of a peanut butter sandwich. Monday morning, I didn’t make my customary trip to Starbucks. Instead, I ate a large bowl of Honey Nut Cherrios. Tuesday, I added blue berries to the Cheerios! I didn’t waste time wondering what to cook. Instead, I became a tweaker…for every calorie-laden meal I had ever cooked, there was a way to get around it. My “treat” became a small bite of 72% dark chocolate. I discovered when eating out, I could make smart choices, or splurge, and only eat a few bites. It became a game. Continue reading

By Connie Warnock, The Northwest Connection

By Connie Warnock, The Northwest Connection

Yesterday, I was asked who I was voting for, and when I replied “Trump” he said, “really?” “Really,” I replied. “Why,” he asked, “do you really think Trump can be a good president?”

Here, word for word is my answer:

Yes, I believe he will make a great President. For starters, he is a self-made man and does not have to prove his success in the private sector. He’s very smart (savvy) and did not get where he is without listening to and observing men already successful in their fields. I believe him to be sincerely sensitive to those less fortunate American citizens. Continue reading

Victoria Woodhull

Victoria Woodhull

Based on the rhetoric surrounding her historic candidacy in 2008 and, in more recent months, leading up to the 2016 campaign, you’d be forgiven for thinking that Hillary Clinton was the first woman ever to run for the nation’s highest office. Far from it.

Few know, though, the name of the woman who challenged the highest glass ceiling. That honor belongs to a colorful and convention-defying woman named Victoria Woodhull, a spiritualist, activist, politician, and author, who ran for the office in 1872, 136 years before Clinton made her first run in 2008. Continue reading

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