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Opinion

Opinion

Kathryn Hickok

By Kathryn Hickok,  Cascade Policy Institute

Your average high school students may not be able to explain a fictional company’s dividends to a lecture hall full of adults from the business world. But after five days at Young Entrepreneurs Business Week, they could.

Students receive instruction on their business simulation (BizSim)

Students receive instruction on their business simulation (BizSim)

YEBW is a nonprofit annual summer camp founded in 2005 by young Oregon entrepreneurs Nick and Maurissa Fisher, hosted on the campuses of the University of Portland, Oregon State University, and University of Oregon. From 75 students on one campus during its first year, YEBW has grown to more than 400 participants on three campuses in 2016.

YEBW’s founders shared a concern that young people of all educational and economic backgrounds often leave high school with no practical business knowledge, hindering their ability to innovate, create, and produce the kinds of goods and services key to Oregon communities’ growth and success. They sought to fill the gap by drawing together curriculum developers, business professionals, educators, and successful youth-focused program leaders to launch an innovative educational program for high school students. Continue reading

Paul Driessen is senior policy analyst for the Committee For A Constructive Tomorrow and a veteran of anti-malaria campaigns

Paul Driessen is senior policy analyst for the Committee For A Constructive Tomorrow and author of Eco-Imperialism: Green power-Black death

It was wrong to interrupt Rio’s delightful opening ceremonies with deceitful agitprop

XXXI Olympiad competitors are joyfully showcasing their skills and sportsmanship, while delighted fans revel in their amazing efforts. But opening ceremonies featuring colorful history, dance, song and athletes were rudely interrupted by an unprecedented propaganda film.

As audiences around the world were getting pumped up in eager anticipation for the upcoming events, a slick but deceitful video soured the mood by inserting partisan climate change politics.

Fossil fuels are warming our planet, and the manmade heat is melting its ice caps, narrators intoned. Animated maps showed Greenland “disappearing very quickly” and Amsterdam, Dubai, Miami, Shanghai, Lagos and Rio being swallowed up by rising seas. Continue reading

Hot topic: AR-15 basics

Hot topic: AR-15 basics

Last month, I supplied foundational evidence for the fact there is no such thing as an assault weapon. So now that we are clear on that, what exactly is an AR-15? This will not be an exhaustive explanation, any details you may want to know would best be found at a local gun shop, or through a firearms expert. Information found online can be confusing, inaccurate, and/or inconsistent. Rather, this is just some basic information for you to have and share since gun control is the hot topic of the moment and doesn‘t appear to be fading from public interest any time soon.

I visited a local gun shop so I could understand firsthand and with the help of an expert, what an AR-15 is. (The owner of the gun shop was invaluable for his patience and help in completing this article.) First, everyone is generalizing military style semi-automatic rifles by the nomenclature “AR-15.” Continue reading

Rich Allen, Troutdale City Councilor

Rich Allen, Troutdale City Councilor

I read a flyer the other day for one of the regional candidates. It talked about values we could all agree with. Then it dawned on me that the person pictured on the flyer was working with the very people that have violated everything I believe in, and that my fellow service people have died for—a republic that represents the people with liberty and justice for all. These aren’t dead words. They actually mean something, and soldiers have been willing to give their lives for the ideals our nation has been founded on.

All too often politicians hire campaign managers and implement polls to find out what we want to hear, then once in office they cater to the people that can help them win the next election. At least twice I have endorsed people that later proved that they couldn’t live up to their campaign promises. It was just too tempting for them to support benefactors instead of us. If you feel like you aren’t represented, you are right. The average person doesn’t attend meetings, or know who is representing them. Certainly there is nothing a good spin can’t take care of. Politicians know it takes money to win an election, and the best contributors are people who make money from their decisions, or the people who have a special interest they want to impose on us. Hence, the folly of our system. Continue reading

Steve Bates

Steve Bates

In a recent Guest Editorial, a sitting Clackamas County Commissioner inferred that it was disingenuous to pursue benefits from property ownership and to attempt to increase the value of one’s property.

How can that be disingenuous?

Is it not the crux of the American Dream to strive to improve one’s standing?

To work to improve one’s finances? Continue reading

Soaking up rays, or soaking the taxpayer?

Soaking up rays, or soaking the taxpayer?

Contrary to popular belief, electric power is not like ice cream. You cannot have any flavor you want whenever you want it. Because power generation equipment is expensive, the only way to keep rates reasonable is to amortize capital costs over generations, meaning that the equipment needs to be utilized and actually last that long.

We have been lucky that previous generations understood this and built robust systems that lasted for a half century, producing power at low cost. Hydro, coal, and nuclear technology served the world admirably. When problems arose, we corrected them and moved on. Fish kills from hydro, noxious sulfur dioxide from coal, and safety issues with nuclear were all competently addressed to perfect the sources of power that have kept the lights on at reasonable cost since Thomas Edison invented the technology. Continue reading

Presidential Candidate Donald Trump

Presidential Candidate Donald Trump

Green gangsters rip us off while enriching the 0.1% and trashing the environment

By Mary Kay Barton

“America is being auctioned off to the highest bidder.” Donald J. Trump

A recent Joe Mahoney article, NY looks to the wind to replace its fossil fuel diet, was full of half-truths and misinformation.

There is nothing “free,” “clean” or “green” about industrial wind. Quite the contrary: the true costs of industrial wind development are astronomical. Yet, the wishful thinking of Governor Andrew Cuomo, Attorney General Eric Schneiderman, “green” ideologues, and “renewable” energy hustlers and subsidy seekers who benefit from this massive taxpayer and ratepayer rip-off has been repeated by countless “journalists” without question for years now. Continue reading

Paul Driessen is senior policy analyst for the Committee For A Constructive Tomorrow and a veteran of anti-malaria campaigns

Paul Driessen is senior policy analyst for the Committee For A Constructive Tomorrow (www.CFACT.org) and author of Eco-Imperialism: Green power- Black death.

Climate change is all-purpose excuse for Big Green and federal misfeasance and malfeasance

First the Obama EPA came for coal mines, coal-fired power plants, miners, workers, investors, and all who depend on reliable, affordable electricity. Then the EPA, Bureau of Land Management, Forest Service and other agencies came after oil and gas drilling and fracking, and the workers, industries and families that need petroleum. They’re also targeting farming, ranching, airlines and manufacturing.

It’s all to stop “dangerous manmade climate change,” rising seas, warmer and colder weather, wetter and drier seasons, and other “unprecedented” calamities. Now the Feds want us to believe worsening forest fires threaten communities, wildlife and wildlife habitats because we burn fossil-fuels. Continue reading

Malibu Hybrid 2016 Suburban Chevrolet 2016-07-17 028

By Jim Kight

By Jim Kight

It didn’t take much encouragement for me to test drive the new Chevrolet Malibu Hybrid. As a matter of fact the general manager for Suburban Chevrolet, Jeff Baldwin, came up with the same car to feature at the same time. The Malibu Hybrid is the latest model to be introduced this spring by GM. It competes with other hybrids that have been on the market longer. The Malibu stand head and shoulders above their competition and highly rated among car critics.

My first impression is the styling. When I walked up to the car I immediately wanted to get behind the wheel. This is one attractive automobile that has very distinctive styling. The seats were very comfortable and easy to adjust with the 6-way power seats and lumbar support for the driver. The passenger side on this model also had power seats. Continue reading

John A. Charles, Jr. is President and CEO of Cascade Policy Institute, Oregon’s free market public policy research organization

John A. Charles, Jr. is President and CEO of Cascade Policy Institute

Portland school superintendent Carole Smith announced her resignation this week after nine years on the job.

The next steps are predictable: The school board will conduct a national search for a successor and eventually sign someone to an expensive contract. After a short honeymoon, the new leader will sink into the bureaucratic quagmire and leave after a short and forgettable tenure.

Management experts know that if system results are disappointing, you need to change the system, not the people. The single most important change Portland could make would be to redesign how the money flows.

Right now, tax dollars go to school bureaucracies, regardless of results. Students are assigned to schools like widgets in a factory, and few families have a “Plan B” if they are unhappy. Continue reading

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