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Opinion

Kathryn Hickok

By Kathryn Hickok,  Cascade Policy Institute

Six years ago, Arizona became the first state to pass an Education Savings Account law for some K-12 students. In April, lawmakers there passed a new ESA bill which expands the program eligibility to include all Arizona children. Florida, Mississippi, and Tennessee also have ESA programs limited to certain students, such as those with special needs. Nevada also passed a near-universal ESA bill, but it is yet to be funded.

Education Savings Accounts put parents in the educational “driver’s seat.” An ESA is analogous to a debit card for qualifying education expenses. It gives parents who want to opt out of a public school that is not meeting their child’s needs a portion of the per-student state funding for spending on their child’s education in other ways. Funds not used by the student in a given year can be rolled over for future years. Continue reading

Gordon J. Fulks, Ph.D

Speaking from the Rose Garden on the first of June, you made a very strong case for withdrawing from the Paris Climate Agreement. Many scientists, including some very famous ones, strongly support your decision, as the best for America and indeed for the world. The further we can distance our nation from the climate madness, the better everyone will be.

America has again become a world leader rather than a follower, thanks entirely to you. Continue reading

John A. Charles, Jr. Cascade Policy Institute

Recently the Oregon Legislature held a hearing on HB 3231, a bill promoted by Rep. Rich Vial (R-Scholls) that would authorize the formation of special districts for the purpose of constructing and operating limited-access highways.

Opponents made many of the same arguments they’ve been using for decades: new highways threaten farmland; increased driving will undermine Oregon’s “climate change” goals; and we can’t “build our way out of congestion.” Continue reading

Gordon J. Fulks, Ph.D

Those who most fervently support the climate paradigm and all the “solutions” that purport to fix “the problem” generally know the least about it. That is hardly surprising, because there is no problem in the first place. Yet the brainwashed inevitably believe that the vast majority of scientists support the concept of a climate catastrophe, even if they do not. That presumed “consensus” alone sustains the faithful. Continue reading

By Paul Driessen

A week dedicated to topics that underscore impacts environmentalists don’t want to discuss

April 22 was Earth Day, the March for Science and Lenin’s birthday (which many say is appropriate, since environmentalism is now green on the outside and red, anti-free enterprise on the inside). April 29 will feature the People’s Climate March and the usual meaningless “Climate change is real” inanity.

The Climate March website says these forces of “The Resistance” intend to show President Trump they will fight his hated energy agenda every step of the way. Science March organizers say they won’t tolerate anyone who tries to “skew, ignore, misuse or interfere with science.” Continue reading

By Paul Driessen

Climate alarmists use faulty science and bald assertions to demand end to fossil fuels

All too many alarmist climate scientists have received millions in taxpayer grants over the years, relied on computer models that do not reflect real-world observations, attacked and refused to debate scientists who disagree with manmade climate cataclysm claims, refused to share their computer algorithms and raw data with reviewers outside their circle of fellow researchers – and then used their work to make or justify demands that the world eliminate the fossil fuels that provide 80% of our energy and have lifted billions out of nasty, brutish, life-shortening poverty and disease. Continue reading

Scot Faulkner

Some history lessons and suggestions to improve US healthcare without breaking the bank

As the White House and Republican leaders debate and negotiate a new bill, the “blamestorming” continues over the earlier failure to repeal and replace Obamacare. Congressional Republicans have only themselves to blame. Since returning to majority status in the House in January 2011, Republicans have formally voted 54 times to address all or part of Obamacare. Six were votes on full appeal.

H.R. 132, from 2015, is typical of these efforts. It simply stated: “such Act is repealed, and the provisions of law amended or repealed by such Act are restored or revived as if such Act had not been enacted.” Why didn’t Republicans vote on this a few weeks ago? Continue reading

Gordon J. Fulks, Ph.D

When I received an email the other day from a Multnomah County employee sporting their new logo “ALL are welcome here,” I wondered if that really applied to older white male scientists who dare to disagree with the County’s official religion “’Climate Hysteria” and all the anti-modern, anti-Christian dogma that goes along with it? Have Multnomah County, the City of Portland, and the surrounding area finally become inclusive and respectful, even welcoming black sheep who are clearly different from them? Or do their concerns merely extend to illegal aliens who have committed a felony and are in danger of being deported?

In hopeful anticipation, I consulted the County website where their concerns were for “immigrants,” “LGBTQ rights, marriage equality,” “seniors, the homeless and children.” Former Chair of the County Board Deborah Kafoury said her goal was “to take a stand against hatred, racism and violence.” Continue reading

Kathryn Hickok, Cascade Policy Institute

Denisha Merriweather failed third grade twice. Today, she is finishing her master’s degree, thanks to Florida’s tax-credit-funded scholarship program. Last month Denisha was President Trump’s guest at his Address to Congress, where he called educational choice “the civil rights issue of our time.”
The key to Denisha’s success was her godmother’s ability to remove Denisha from a school that was failing her, and to send her to the school that provided her with the support she needed.
Denisha says: “Now that I’m in graduate school, I can look up statistics that suggest I’ve beaten the odds….[S]tudents who don’t read proficiently by the third grade are four times as likely to drop out of high school as those who do….”
“That was me.” Continue reading

Bryan Fischer, Follow me on Twitter: @BryanJFischer, on Facebook at “Focal Point”

Well, now we know why the GOP establishment kept their ObamaCare replacement package locked in a room where not even GOP senators could read it. Everyone naturally wondered what they were hiding, and now we know. They were hiding it because it is a horrible, no good, very bad piece of legislation.

If it repeals ObamaCare in any meaningful sense (and it doesn’t), it only replaces it with something as bad if not worse. This is exactly the kind of bill you would expect to come from the swamp that so desperately needs to be drained.

This bill does not drain the swamp. It instead brings the swamp under the protection of the public policy equivalent of the EPA, guaranteeing that no one will be able to touch it, and ensuring that it will be an ugly and barren part of the American landscape until the end of time. Continue reading

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