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Opinion

By True Oregonian

There was a time that when I thought of Portland Oregon, I thought of rivers, bridges, fine dining, Forest Park, and so many other idyllic things that made Portland amazing.

Friends and family always talked about visiting. Those that did often came back for obvious reasons. I remember telling people that we only let people believe it rains here all the time so that they don’t want to move here.

Those days feel like a distant memory. Not because of the worldwide shutdown, but because of the seemingly endless violent riots.

As of Monday, August 17th, 2020, the World has come to know Portland, Oregon as the American City that has had the longest running civil disorder since the death of George Floyd, standing at 80 days.

There is a lot of debate about what has been going on in Portland. Wikipedia says this about civil disorder: Continue reading

Rachel Dawson, Policy Analyst, Cascade Policy Institute

Governor Did you ever watch the Simpsons and think nuclear waste from utility plants looked like glowing green goo oozing out of cans?

If you answered yes, you might be the victim of media propaganda. The waste produced by utility nuclear power plants is not a leaking green goo. In fact, it’s not capable of leaking at all as nuclear waste is a solid metal rod (better known as a spent fuel rod) instead of the green ooze many associate it with.

These misconceptions are important to dispel as potential future power shortages along with increased clean power mandates make having a clean and reliable baseload power source like nuclear increasingly important.

In reality, nuclear fuel is made up of multiple ceramic pellets stacked vertically in long metal tubes. The resulting waste looks no different and actually has the “consistency of a teacup.”

Nuclear spent fuel remains radioactive for thousands of years. But the idea that it will one day be unearthed and “spilled” across green pastures and waterways is a scenario based more on science fiction than reality. Continue reading

By American Exceptionalism

As of July 29th, 2020, the Portland media has announced that 303 people have died in Oregon from Covid-19(1). Out of a population of 4,301,090(2), that is a 0.007% statewide death rate.

The majority of deaths throughout the country are from the elderly and those with underlying conditions, also known as comorbidity. We know this now and the data is easily verified by a myriad of reports.

So, if the actual risk of death is fractional, and the response should be to treat the entire situation like we’re dealing with a bad bout of an influenza virus, why is there still this ever-present reminder that we need to be afraid of dying from Covid-19, and therefore continue shutdowns and mandates with no end in sight?

Regardless of the most up to date facts and figures, government officials in Oregon continue to implement stringent mandates that have forced entire industries to shut down, many businesses to shutter permanently, and our way of life to irretrievably change.

To further cement this new reality, the State of Oregon recently came out with a Covid-19 ad campaign. Oregonians young and old have been subjected to billboards, computer ads, and TV commercials that have some very disturbing messages: Continue reading

Bryan Fischer

The Republican National Committee (RNC) voted this week to keep the 2016 platform, in part due to the intransigence of Democrat governor Roy Cooper of North Carolina. He refused the RNC the opportunity to convene before this year’s Republican national convention. This is customarily when platform issues are reviewed and updates are made.

However, the truth is the 2016 platform is just fine the way it is. In fact, it is great the way it is. This is the platform that put Donald Trump in the White House. The platform that gave control of the White House and all of Congress to the Republican Party in 2016 ain’t broke. There’s no need to fix it. (There are some anachronisms in it, references to policies of the previous administration, but these can easily and quickly be updated.)

Donald Trump won on this platform in 2016, and he can win on this platform in 2020. In fact, radically reworking this platform is the only thing that could threaten an electoral win on November 3.

The main danger comes from the relentless effort of the Log Cabin Republicans, a group that advocates fiercely for the normalization of homosexuality. After celebrating the Supreme Court decision in Bostock that inexcusably redefined the word “sex” in Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act to give special rights to transgenders, the LCR said, “While we celebrate today, we know that the real work needs to continue in Congress passing bipartisan legislation that will update the Civil Rights Act and remove any ambiguity that sexual orientation and gender identity are protected.” Continue reading

Helen Doran

Oregon guidelines for the 2020 fall semester have been remarkably inconsistent, causing confusion and mayhem for faculty, parents, and students alike. The Oregon Department of Education recently released new guidelines that allow students with special needs to have limited in-person instruction but with reduced hours and class size. This includes students with disabilities, English language learners, and those enrolled in career technical education (CTE) programs.

But even these guidelines are dependent on the absence of Covid-19 cases among staff and students for two weeks. This doesn’t guarantee a stable learning environment for students that need stability the most.

The guidelines also fail to explicitly address those affected by the decision to continue virtual learning in the fall. What happens to the student experiencing homelessness who has no access to a hotspot? What about the single mother who has to choose between keeping a job and staying at home with her child?

It’s time to face the reality that Oregon’s public school system cannot guarantee a “one-size-fits-all” solution for students this fall. A money-back guarantee for K-12 education would go a long way in empowering parents to find the stability they need in uncertain times. Continue reading

David Wojick, PhD

By Paul Driessen

Not just for energy, but for every aspect of our lives, living standards, culture and freedoms

David Wojick and Paul Driessen

Kamala Harris co-sponsored the Senate resolution to support the Green New Deal. Now Joe Biden has endorsed the plan. Naturally, people want to know what the GND will cost – usually meaning in state and federal government spending. But that is the wrong question.

The real question is, how much do Green New Dealers expect to get out of it, at what total cost? Mr. Biden says he wants the feds to spend nearly $7 trillion over the next decade on healthcare, energy and housing transformation, climate change and other GND agenda items. But that is only part of the picture.

Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (who has a degree in some socialist version of economics) and the folks who helped her write Biden’s so-called Climate Plan have a clear idea of how much money they want, and pretty much know where they expect the money to come from. Here it is in its clearest form, as stated by Rep. Ocasio-Cortez’s then chief of staff, Saikat Chakrabarti: Continue reading

Jerry Newcombe

With violence in the streets of many of our most prominent cities, there is an underlying subtheme that is also troubling. Christophobia, which attacks anything Christian, is surely on the march.

Perhaps the latest example is the burning of Bibles in recent Portland protests.

On 8/2/20, Washington Examiner noted, “Portland protesters were filmed burning Bibles and the American flag as protests continue in the city for more than two months. Republican Texas Sen. Ted Cruz responded to a Friday video of people burning what was described as a ‘stack of Bibles’ on Twitter Saturday, saying, ‘This is who they are.’”

In reference to this bonfire, journalist Ian Miles Cheong, managing editor of Human Events, tweeted, “I don’t know what burning the Bible has to do with protesting against police brutality.” And he added, “Do not be under the illusion that these protests and riots are anything but an attempt to dismantle all of Western Civilization and upend centuries of tradition and freedom of religion.”

How interesting to note that the focus of the ceaseless attacks in Portland has been the Mark O. Hatfield Federal Courthouse. The late Mark Hatfield, a long-time senator from the state of Oregon, was known for years as an outspoken follower of Jesus. Continue reading

John R. Charles, Jr. President, Cascade Policy Institute

Last month, the Metro Council voted to send a regional payroll tax to the November ballot. The rationale for the new $250-million-a-year tax is primarily to help fund a 12-mile light rail extension from Portland to Bridgeport Village in Tigard. It will also pay for a smattering of minor transportation projects throughout the region, but those are just ornaments on the tree.

There are at least three problems with this proposal. The first is that we already pay two transit taxes: the TriMet payroll tax assessed on employers, and the statewide transit tax collected from employees’ paychecks that was adopted by the Legislature in 2017. Most people don’t benefit from either one, because they don’t use transit. Adding a third tax to pay for light rail to Tigard ­– called the Southwest Corridor project – makes no sense.

Second, light rail ridership peaked in 2012 and has been dropping ever since. Now, amid the coronavirus pandemic, it is down about 70% from last July, according to TriMet ridership numbers. With many worried about the inability to physically distance on public transit and the prospect that some may work from home permanently, more rail is the wrong project at the wrong time. Continue reading

Bryan Fischer

The Constitution says that a vice-president must meet the same eligibility requirements as the president: “[N]o person constitutionally ineligible to the office of President shall be eligible to that of Vice-President of the United States.” Article II of the Constitution specifies “[n]o person except a natural born citizen…shall be eligible to the office of President.”

Senator Kamala Harris is not, from a constitutional standpoint, a natural-born citizen of the United States. She was born on American soil, but that’s not enough to qualify for birthright citizenship. Here is the actual language of the 14th Amendment (emphasis mine throughout):“All persons born or naturalized in the United States, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States and of the State wherein they reside.” It’s not enough just to be born on U.S. soil. You must both be born on U.S. soil and be subject “to the jurisdiction thereof” when it happens.

It’s not even enough that one’s parents be legally present in the U.S. at the time of the child’s birth. The issue is to whom the parents – and therefore the child – owe their ultimate allegiance. So while they may temporarily be subject to the jurisdiction of the U.S., their ultimate allegiance, the ultimate jurisdiction to which they are subject, belongs to the nation of their birth, the land where they possess citizenship and from which they came. Continue reading

Jerry Newcombe

Bible-burning on the streets of Portland may be old news by now, but there is an irony lost to many in burning the Scriptures. All these protests are presumably part of the Black Lives Matter (BLM) movement. But if one truly believed that Black lives matter (or all lives, really), the last book you would want to burn is the Bible.

Slavery has been around since the dawn of time. However, as African-American scholar Dr. Walter Williams, professor of economics at George Mason University, told me in an interview: “The significant thing about the Western world is that we have spent so many resources to uproot slavery and abolish it. And the Bible played a key role in that abolition.”

One man in particular, converted by the Bible, played the vital role in abolishing slavery. William Wilberforce (1759-1833) was a longtime Member of Parliament, who spent the last 50 years of life fighting against slavery in the British Empire. Wilberforce grew up in the lap of luxury and wealth. He became a member of the House of Commons at age 21, a position he held for forty-five years. At first, his life in politics was just a cushy job with lots of perks. But about five years into his service in Parliament, Wilberforce became a devout Christian, and he became much more serious about trying to have a positive impact on the world. Continue reading

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