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Opinion

Miranda Bonifield

TriMet recently announced its first “zero-emission” bus is ready to roll, claiming that wind-powered buses are cleaner and easier to maintain. But the reality is that electric buses are dirtier and more expensive than traditional buses.

Wind and solar energy are both known as “intermittent resources” because both kinds of energy farming have long time periods when they don’t generate any power. Unfortunately, energy can’t just be stored like other commodities—as soon as it enters the power grid, it has to travel directly to the end user. There must be a constant supply to meet demand, or customers will not receive power reliably. Continue reading

“I am concerned for the security of our great nation; not so much because of any threat from without, but because of insidious forces working from within.” General Douglas MacArthur

“While [America] retains its sound and healthful state, everything will be safe . . It is only when the people become ignorant and corrupt, when they degenerate . . the people themselves become the willing instruments of their own debasement and ruin.”President James Monroe

“An elective despotism is not the government we fought for.” Thomas Jefferson Continue reading

Bryan Fischer

The current tax code is now four million words long, more than four times longer than the collected works of Shakespeare, and six to seven times longer than the Bible. It requires 25 volumes to contain it, and takes up nine feet of shelf space.

According to Forbes, it takes Americans over six billion hours to comply with its filing requirements. That’s the equivalent of 8,758 lifetimes. In people years, not dog years.

This monstrosity is based entirely on the 16th Amendment, which authorizes Congress “to lay and collect taxes on incomes, from whatever source derived.” Continue reading

Bryan Fischer

The bottom line from the Mueller report: President Trump has been exonerated of charges that he colluded with Russia and that he obstructed justice.

First, Bob Mueller completely cleared the president of any and all charges of collusion. Collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia never existed. There is no evidence to the contrary, nada, zip, zilch.

Secondly, Bill Barr cleared the president of obstruction of justice charges. While Mueller left the question open, he made it clear that there was no evidence that would compel him (Mueller) to press charges against the president. So if not even the sainted Mueller would prosecute this case, regressives are left flailing while trying to grasp at straws. Continue reading

John R. Charles, Jr. President, Cascade Policy Institute

Testimony Before the Joint Subcommittee on Capital Construction HB 5005

Members of the subcommittee, my name is John Charles and I am President and CEO of Cascade Policy Institute, a nonpartisan policy research organization.

Most witnesses ask you to spend money. I am here asking you to save money – by deleting the Governor’s request for $27.5 million in lottery-backed bonds for TriMet’s planned light rail line to Bridgeport Village mall near Tualatin.

It’s important to note that HB 5005 is actually the first part of a two-part request for this project. As Ms. Gabriel stated in her April 5 briefing, the Governor will be asking for an additional $125 million of bond revenue in the next biennium, so you should really think of this as an appropriation of $152.5 million. Continue reading

Eric Fruits, Ph.D.

I’ve got a big family, which means we do a lot of laundry. With our old appliances, we were doing a load a day and there was a backlog of dirty clothes.

When our old washer and dryer went kaput, we decided on an upgrade. I bought the biggest, most energy efficient washer and dryer I could afford. I figured with bigger loads, we’d be doing fewer loads. But in some ways, I was wrong. Sure, the new washer and dryer could hold a lot more laundry, but we were still doing about a load a day.

However, something changed: The backlog of dirty clothes disappeared, and our utility bills decreased. Even though we are still Continue reading

Miranda Bonifield

April 16 was the first day of 2019 where the money Americans have earned finally exceeded the portion of our income dedicated to the support of the government. Tax Freedom Day is an annual reminder of the real cost of expanding government’s power and responsibilities. The $5.2 trillion we spend on taxes in 2019—29% of our income—will outpace our spending on food, clothing, and shelter combined.

Unfortunately, this is only what we’ll pay this year—not what the government will spend. If annual federal borrowing were taken into account, Tax Freedom Day would fall on May 8, meaning we would work nearly half of this year to support government programs. Continue reading

Jim Wagner, The Northwest Connection

If you allow your mind to travel back through time to the arrival of Columbus in the new world, you are nearly half way to the laying of the foundation for the Cathedral of Notre Dame in Paris.

The first article linked below was written the day before yesterday’s Notre Dame Cathedral fire. In view of the content of that article and the facts reported, I have two questions. First, is it not curious that French authorities have already ruled out arson, especially since they announced this morning (April 16) that it will not be safe for them to enter the structure for two more days? Do not arson investigators normally need to examine the site before they announce their conclusion?

Secondly, given the extent of recent Christian church desecration in France (https://www.gatestoneinstitute.org/14044/europe-churches-vandalized), is it not odd that authorities and the press consider it “racist” or “Islamophobic” to entertain the possibility that the fire was Continue reading

Eric Fruits, Ph.D.

This week, Portland’s City Council will get the first annual report on how the city is spending its affordable housing bond money. The four-page report—yes, it’s really only four pages—is colorful and has lots of pictures but nothing about actual results. So, I did some research.

Turns out, by the end of 2018, the city spent almost $38 million and built exactly zero new units of affordable housing. Sure, Portland bought two buildings. But, the buildings were already built or almost completely built, which means the money did nothing to actually add any new units. Continue reading

By Paul Driessen

Fish & Wildlife Service director nominee joins hundreds of others in confirmation limbo

Aurelia Skipwith has a BS in biology from Howard University, a Master’s in molecular genetics from Purdue and a law degree from Kentucky. She has worked as a molecular analyst and sustainable agriculture partnership manager. She was also co-founder and general counsel for AVC Global, a Washington, DC-based agricultural supply chain development company that helps small farmers link up with multinational buyers and with agronomy, business, financial and other service providers.  Continue reading

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