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Featured Stories

Frank Maguire

“When we have learned to love our neighbor, not just ourselves, no matter where we come from, then America will be perfect.”

“Trying to build the brotherhood of man without the Fatherhood of God is like having the spokes of a wheel without the hub”.

Dunne was nominated five times for the Academy Award for Best Actress – for her performances in Cimarron (1931), Theodora Goes Wild (1936), The Awful Truth (1937), Love Affair (1939), and I Remember Mama (1948).

Dunne earned a diploma to teach art, but took a chance on a contest and won a prestigious scholarship to the Chicago Musical College, where she graduated in 1926. With a soprano voice, she had hopes of becoming an opera singer, but did not pass the audition with the Metropolitan Opera Company. Continue reading

Helen Maguire

Truman decorates Corporal Desmond Doss

In May, 1945, as German troops were surrendering on the other side of the world, Japanese troops were fiercely defending the only remaining barrier (Okinawa and the Maeda Escarpment) to an allied invasion of their homeland. The men in the 77th Infantry Division were repeatedly trying to capture the Maeda Escarpment, an imposing rock face the soldiers called Hacksaw Ridge.

Less than one third of the men in the company made it back down. The rest lay wounded, scattered across enemy soil—abandoned and left for dead, if they weren’t already. One lone soldier disobeyed orders and charged back into the firefight to rescue as many of his men as he could, before he either collapsed or died trying. His iron determination and unflagging courage resulted in at least 75 lives saved that day, May 5, 1945.

“…I just kept prayin’, ‘Lord, please help me get more and more, one more, until there was none left….'” Continue reading

A five-year-old boy is sitting in the middle of the kitchen eating raw oatmeal. The kitchen is one of the two rooms in the tiny house. When his family had moved in, there was only one room, but his father built a cardboard partition to make a distinction between the kitchen and the bedroom. Five people sleep in this bedroom.

The house has no indoor plumbing. Water is drawn from a well outside and kept in a bucket in the corner of the kitchen. Other toilet functions are accomplished in an outhouse 150 feet behind the house.

Cooking is done on a portable kerosene stove. A tin wood-burning stove provides heat in the icy winter, but not much, for there is no insulation in the walls: there is not even an inner wall. If the stove gets too hot, it will melt, but there’s not much danger of that. It’s too small to hold much wood. Continue reading

17th century displays, crafts galore, and apples!

Gorge Fruit and Craft Fair at Hood River returns to the County Fairgrounds at 3020 Wy’east Road in Odell, Oregon on October 19-20, from 10am to 5pm; admission and parking are free.

Are you dreaming of fall colors and bountiful harvests of delicious local apples and pears? Join us as we celebrate all the joys of a new fall season at the Gorge Fruit and Craft Fair at Hood River County Fairgrounds.

Last year’s special guest, Society for Creative Anachronism (SCA), returns with special displays of various medieval reproductions of clothing, cooking, household items and traditional tools, archery, fencing and more from the pre-17th century time period. They’ll also conduct hatchet throwing demonstrations in the park. Continue reading

Frank Salvato

This is what happens when we stop teaching civics and government classes in high school. People start believing that politics is government and that appearances and personal opinion circumvent the rule of law and the US Constitution. This is a direct result of the Progressive Movement having captured the education system and the mainstream media complex.

The Associated Press published a piece on October 12th, titled, “Former Ukraine envoy testifies Trump pushed to oust her”. In the article it states:

“…former US Ambassador to Ukraine Marie Yovanovitch told House impeachment investigators Friday that Trump himself pressured the State Department to oust her from her post and get her out of the country.”

Just the day before the AP published no less than three articles under three different titles covering the exact same content: Continue reading

Bryan Fischer

Donald Trump’s decision to remove American troops from the Syrian-Turkish border has become a flashpoint of international controversy. The bulk of the criticism of Trump has come from two directions. Politically, he is being condemned for abandoning the Kurds, an ally in our fight against ISIS. Spiritually, he is being condemned for abandoning the Christians in Kuridsh-occupied territory to an uncertain but an almost certain nightmarish fate.

For someone like me, a Christian first and an American second, it’s not easy to sort through everything and arrive at what seems to be the position that is the strongest both morally and ethically. I believe the president has done the correct thing here, and would like to explain why.

It’s worthy of note, for starters, to remember that the president campaigned on doing exactly what he is doing now. This is not a Continue reading

Alyssa Ahlgren

A main driver of left-wing thought, as evident in the policy recommendations by front running Democratic candidates like Bernie Sanders, is income inequality. Income inequality is measured by a gap in wealth; the difference between the wealthiest Americans and the poorest. To the left, not only is this inequity falsely seen as a benchmark for negative economic and fiscal health of a nation’s populace, it’s seen as a moral evil. The wealth gap is the bedrock of the Democratic Party platform going into 2020 and the answer is limiting monetary success through increased centralization of federal power.

Inequality is no longer an objective term. To the left, disparity is the result of discrimination. To the right, disparity is the inevitable result of equal opportunity and meritocracy. Regardless of where you fall on the description, income inequality is not an indicator of a Continue reading

Miranda Bonifield

Metro’s attempts to provide low-income public housing since last year’s $653 million bond measure passed have been stymied by the same problem encountered by cities from Portland to Stockholm: Metro’s preferred way of building housing is too expensive to be sustainable.

But instead of addressing the overwhelming costs of its projects, Metro is doubling down on ineffective practices which neither accomplish its goals nor increase the supply of so-called affordable housing.

For instance, Metro’s interest in “leading with racial equity” means they prioritize firms certified to be owned by minorities, women, or “emerging small businesses.” Members of Metro’s housing bond oversight committee recounted multiple stories in early meetings of contractors who circumvent the certification’s requirements by outsourcing their government work to other, non-certified contractors—rendering the certification nearly meaningless. Continue reading

John A. Charles, Jr.

Eric Fruits, Ph.D.

In the next week or so, Portland area voters will receive their November ballots. One of the items is Measure 26-203: a $475 million bond measure by Metro, the regional government for the Portland area. Metro wants the money so it can buy more land for its so-called parks and nature program. Measure 26-203 will raise the region’s property taxes by about $60 million a year. The $475 million request is larger than the two previous Metro natural areas bonds combined, which were $135.6 million dollars in 1995 and $227.4 million dollars in 2006.

Cascade Policy Institute has published a comprehensive study of Metro’s parks and nature program, with the following conclusions: Continue reading

(Editor’s Note: This article was originally published on RenewAmerica.com on July 29, 2016)

Dr. Ben Carson raised some eyebrows last week at the Republican National Convention when he mentioned Hillary Clinton and Lucifer. At first blush, it may have sounded over the top. The press went to town on this remark, castigating Carson for it.

Here is what Carson said, “Now one of the things that I have learned about Hillary Clinton is that one of her heroes, her mentors, was Saul Alinsky and her senior thesis was about Saul Alinsky. This was someone that she greatly admired and that affected all of her philosophies subsequently.”

He added, “This is a nation where every coin in our pocket and every bill in our wallet says, ‘In God we trust.’ So are we willing to elect someone as president who has as their role model somebody who acknowledges Lucifer?”

I would add that the key verb there isn’t just “acknowledges” but “approves of.” Continue reading

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