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Asian elephant Chendra in the North Meadow habitat, part of Elephant Lands at the Oregon Zoo. © Oregon Zoo / photo by Michael Durham.

Abundance of caution applied pending definitive news on possible TB infection

Chendra, a 26-year-old Asian elephant at the Oregon Zoo, is pregnant and expected to deliver another member of Portland’s elephant family in late 2020.

The pregnancy — while long hoped for and strongly encouraged by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums’ Species Survival Plan for Asian elephants — was a happy surprise for zoo staff. Over the past decade, Chendra has spent time with several male elephants but until recently was not observed engaging in breeding behavior, according to Bob Lee, who oversees the zoo’s elephant area. At around 26, she was nearing the outer age limit for first-time elephant moms; elephants that don’t conceive by their mid-20s rarely conceive at all.

“We are so excited for Chendra,” Lee said. “Raising a calf is one of the most enriching things an elephant can experience, and we didn’t know whether she would ever have that chance. Asian elephants have evolved to live in social groups, and every member of the group has some role in raising young. We’re thrilled by the prospect that Chendra and the rest of the herd may get that opportunity in the near future.” Continue reading

John A. Charles, Jr.

Portland-area motorists who have to regularly cross the Sellwood Bridge may wonder why the new structure is twice as wide as the 1925 bridge, yet has the same number of travel lanes. The answer is simple. Portland transportation planners don’t want to solve traffic congestion problems; they prefer to make them worse.

We know this because 20 years ago, Metro published a report entitled the “South Willamette River Crossing Study” (SWRCS), which examined the long-term bridge needs in the stretch of the Willamette River from the Marquam Bridge down to Oregon City. The study found that by 2015, levels of traffic congestion on those bridges would be at “unacceptable or grossly unacceptable levels” if new capacity wasn’t provided.

The study also looked at numerous potential sites for a new bridge but ultimately recommended that no new crossings be constructed. The Metro Council decided instead to focus on “transportation demand management” (TDM) to address the growing congestion.  TDM is an amorphous concept utilizing public relations campaigns and regulatory mandates to encourage drivers to shift to other modes of travel. Continue reading

Bryan Fischer

Folks, don’t let the Talking Snake Media lie to you. Not only does man-caused global warming not exist, it is the scientific hoax of the century. And 90 leading Italian scientists say so.

All of them signed a detailed letter to lawmakers which challenges the claim that man is causing catastrophic global warming, and that CO2 emissions are the culprit.

They argue that our policies with regard to global warming should not be based on hysterics but should be “consistent with scientific knowledge.” I couldn’t agree more. Continue reading

Bryan Fischer

Colin Kaepernick kicked up a massive dust storm by complaining when Nike put the Betsy Ross flag on the heel of a shoe. You’d have thought by the hue and cry from the regressive left that they had used the Nazi swastika.

Nike means “Victory” in Greek. It is supposed to symbolize masculine strength, a determination to conquer against all odds and to take on the biggest, baddest bully on the block without flinching. But Nike, forgetting all about the spirit that won our freedom from the British, collapsed like a cheap Bedouin tent in a stiff desert breeze.

Michael Eric Dyson, a regressive professor at Georgetown, actually did compare the Betsy Ross flag to the swastika and made the flag virtually a symbol of the KKK by comparing it to burning crosses. Continue reading

Vlad Yurlov

In the 2018 general election, voters approved a bond measure that enabled Metro to borrow about $652 million for low-income public housing in the tri-county area. This money will be given out to localities within Metro. With the minimum of 3,900 housing units to be built, the price-tag would be more than $165,000 per unit.

When pressed for completion times for this project, a high-level Metro staffer stated new units can be expected to be used in eight to ten years. This schedule should not surprise anyone who has dealt with government bureaucracies, but a decade is a long time to wait for a crisis we’re having today.

For comparison, more than 6,700 housing units were constructed per year between 2010 and 2018 in the tri-county area, based on the U.S. Census Annual Housing Estimates. This means that even a target of 3,900 units would be roughly 60% of just one year’s worth of private construction. In addition, if Metro does build homes, private companies have less incentive to build, thereby compounding the current crisis.

A good government delivers public services on time and on budget. Right now, Metro is taking the bucks, without making much of a bang.

Vlad Yurlov is a Research Associate at Cascade Policy Institute, Oregon’s free market public policy research organization. Continue reading

Bryan Fischer

Uh-oh. New data from the notorious pro-homosexual organization GLAAD reveals that

America is rapidly falling out of love with the radial LGBT movement. And guess who is leading this wave of disaffection? Millennials aged 18-34.

Big Gay is non-plussed. Said the New Civil Rights Movement, “Days before the nation’s 50th anniversary of the Stonewall Riots and the start of World Pride in New York, a new study is measuring American attitudes toward LGBTQ people – and the results aren’t stellar.” Continue reading

In January 2019 the City of Portland implemented a voter-approved a 1% tax on certain “retail sales” within Portland to fund clean energy projects and jobs training. This tax will be applied to retailers with $1 billion or more in total sales, $500,000 of which must be from within Portland city limits. Retailers can pass the cost of the tax along to the purchaser of the good or service. Thus, it is likely consumers—not retailers—will ultimately be paying for it. Once collected, these funds will be administered by the Portland Clean Energy Fund.

Despite claims that the Portland Clean Energy Fund is unique, the energy efficiency projects funded by this tax are already being completed by the Energy Trust of Oregon (ETO) and Oregon Housing and Community Services through a surcharge on ratepayers’ utility bills. In some cases, the Portland Clean Energy Fund will be triple-taxing Portland utility ratepayers. Continue reading

Marlon Furtado

I hate roller coasters. I almost get seasick just watching television coverage of some theme park’s new “biggest roller coaster ever.” If they think that is going to inspire me to vacation at their park, they have another thing coming. I see absolutely no excitement to being pulled straight up several stories, only to freefall straight down before being thrown upside down and barreling through corkscrews.

I think my dislike for roller coasters is because my head doesn’t do well with fast movements. One Spring Break, Karen and I took our young children to a neighborhood carnival. Alli loved the fast rides, so we teamed her up with a little boy to ride together. When he left, Alli asked me to go on a ride with her. I looked for the slowest one I could find. When I saw Tilt-a-Wheel, I thought “how bad can that be?” As soon as the ride began, I realized I had made a BIG mistake. When the ride finally stopped, my head kept spinning. When we got back home, I immediately went to bed, where I stayed two days before feeling normal again. Continue reading

By Paul Driessen

Ann Bridges author

It’s an essential first step in making the USA less dangerously dependent on foreign minerals

As we celebrate the Declaration of Independence, let us view it from a 21st century perspective.

Many of the colonists’ grievances against King George III resonate today, as tyrannical environmentalists continue to block domestic development of minerals that are critical for our businesses, security and living standards. To protect our freedoms, we have updated that revered 1776 statement, to highlight and upend the status quo. Continue reading

Bryan Fischer

This is not your father’s low-THC marijuana

If you care about teenagers and their mental health, the rush to legalize marijuana in America is a great example of a really, really bad idea.
THC is the active ingredient in pot. According to the Washington Post, some of today’s marijuana products average a 68% concentration of THC, stratospherically higher than what my college classmates smoked back in the day. This is not your father’s dope. One dad whose son wound up in an expensive rehab program calls it “nuclear-strength weed.”

Science confirms that earlier and more frequent use of this high-octane cannabis does put adolescents in greater jeopardy of a number of pathologies, including substance abuse disorders and mental health issues. It has a clearly established and negative impact on school performance.

And the particularly noteworthy problem is that pot has a dramatic effect on developing teen brains. The part of the brain that controls problem solving, memory, language, and judgment is not fully developed until age 25, and marijuana messes with that part of the growing brain. As a result, we are seeing an epidemic of dope-induced psychosis, addiction, suicide, depression, and anxiety. Continue reading

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