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Dan Bosserman, The Northwest Connection

TO:                 Dean of Extraterrestrial Studies

Galactic University, HomeStar

FROM:           Agent-in-Place, Planet Earth,

North American Continent

SUBJECT:      Local native customs and rituals:

“Independence Day”

DATE:                        July 3, 2019, local time

Honored Superior:

With some trepidation I forward a report on the so-called “work ethic” of this species. Their social system and attitudes toward what they naively refer to as “employment” are so bizarre and alarming, that merely to describe them seems almost to imply that I sympathize with them; and I realize that such sympathy would result in my immediate recall and vaporization.

Nevertheless, I am dedicated to recording historical truth as I observe it, whatever the consequences may be to my personal safety. Accordingly, I have made use of our ability to mind-meld and control the actions of other entities by taking over the personality of a native known as Dan Bosserman, a sort of serf or menial attached to an organization dedicated to the manufacture and distribution of totally useless objects that are somehow prized by this culture.

The extent of this labyrinthine network will be the subject of a separate transmission dealing with the infinite levels of complexity this species delights in, but is much too confusing for this report. This Bosserman creature carries out a function you will scarcely believe, but more of that later. Continue reading

Kathryn Hickok, Cascade Policy Institute

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled June 30 in Espinoza v. Montana Department of Revenue that states’ school choice laws may not discriminate against religiously affiliated schools.

Montana’s tax credit scholarship program, passed in 2015, enabled families to send their children to the private schools of their choice. The program was ruled unconstitutional by the Montana Supreme Court because some participating students wanted to apply their scholarships to religious schools, which the Department of Revenue argued violated the state’s Blaine Amendment. The Institute for Justice (IJ) appealed this decision on behalf of parents, arguing that the Court’s decision violated the Free Exercise, Equal Protection, and Establishment Clauses of the U.S. Constitution.

The Supreme Court decided in favor of the Montana parents, stating that “[a] State need not subsidize private education. But once a State decides to do so, it cannot disqualify some private schools solely because they are religious.” Continue reading

Tony Perkins, Family Research Council, Washington Update

Chances are, these Supreme Court justices will never meet the parents of Jamie Lee Morales. They’ll never have to look in the eyes of the little boy left behind by Tonya Reaves or console the husband of Jennifer Morbelli. They won’t have to explain how Karnamaya Mongar survived war in Nepal only to die in the filthy recliner of a Philadelphia abortion center. Because even though three of them have daughters, the five justices who struck down Louisiana’s abortion law don’t seem to care that young women will keep dying because of courts like theirs.

“Unnecessary.” That’s the word the majority of justices used to describe a law that would have kept 10,000 women a year safe. Women, who, when they walk through the doors of Louisiana’s abortion centers every year, are under the assumption they’ll be protected. That their doctors care. Jamie Lee would give anything to warn them — to tell them to turn back and go home — but she’ll never have the chance. She bled to death in the back of her sister’s car because her abortionist didn’t want to call an ambulance over the seven-inch gash he put in her uterus.

Today, five justices sided with him. They said asking doctors like Robert Rho to have a relationship with a local hospital was “a burden.” That it didn’t “further women’s health.” That it was “an obstacle to abortion access.” By tearing down Louisiana’s law, the Supreme Court gave women access all right — to shoddy, life-threatening care. In Pennsylvania, that “care” was an inner-city torture chamber where “semi-conscious, moaning women sat on Continue reading

Marlon Furtado

We expect our friends to be loyal. How would you feel if your closest friend cowardly denied knowing you? Friends who forsake you create some of the deepest scars. For 3 ½ years Peter had been groomed by the Lord to be the leader of the disciples after His death, resurrection, and return to Heaven. Yet, when the chips were down, Peter failed.

Peter had heard the Lord’s words. With his own eyes, He had seen diseases healed instantly, food multiplied, storms stilled, and demons overpowered. When Jesus told all the disciples that they would soon abandon Him, Peter boasted, “Even if all fall away on account of you, I never will.” (Matthew 26:33)

Only a few hours later, Peter’s bravado failed him, and he denied knowing the Lord. Like Peter, our pride leads us to have an elevated view of ourselves. After his third denial, “The Lord turned and looked straight at Peter.” (Luke 22:61) Could you imagine how that must have devastated Peter when his eyes locked onto those of the Lord! Continue reading

Jerry Newcombe

Ronald Reagan once noted, “Freedom is never more than one generation away from extinction. We didn’t pass it to our children in the bloodstream. It must be fought for, protected, and handed on for them to do the same, or one day we will spend our sunset years telling our children and our children’s children what it was once like in the United States where men were free.”

There is a frenzy right now of iconoclasm. We are going through a period where so-called “Social Justice Warriors,” are tearing down statues left and right.

It began with heroes of the confederacy, such as Robert E. Lee, but now it has even reached General Lee’s great rival—General Ulysses S. Grant, commander of the Union army.

When does it stop? Where does it stop? So many statues, so little time. Just last week in the state of Oregon, rioters targeted a statue of George Washington, spray-painting the words “Genocidal Colonist.” Then they burned a U.S. flag on the head of the statue, before pulling it down. And they reveled in their supposedly good deed. Continue reading

Rachel Dawson, Policy Analyst, Cascade Policy Institute

Governor Kate Brown took carbon policy into her own hands earlier this year after the failure of Oregon’s cap-and-trade bill by issuing Executive Order 20-04. This order creates new greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reduction goals and directs various agencies to take actions and exercise their authority to reduce GHG emissions.

Four agencies, the Department of Transportation (ODOT), Department of Land Conservation and Development (DLC), Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ), and Department of Energy (ODOE), collaborated to develop a draft statewide work plan in response to the governor’s directive, known as the Every Mile Counts initiative.

The strategy is fundamentally flawed. On the one hand, it duplicates efforts already underway. On the other hand, it does so in a way that will impose additional costs on Oregonians without producing any measurable effects on global climate change.

Objective 1: Reduce VMT per capita
The work plan proposes a number of action items aimed at decreasing statewide vehicle miles traveled. In the 2004 Statewide Congestion Overview for Oregon report, ODOT predicted that we could expect an additional 15,500 vehicle miles traveled (VMT) annually for every job created in Oregon and 360 additional VMT for every $1,000 increase in total state personal income. Continue reading

Vlad Yurlov

Alcohol-lovers may have a reason for a toast. Oregon’s Liquor Control Commission is taking steps to decrease regulations on sellers, thereby expanding economic opportunity in the food and beverage industry, which was hit particularly hard by the COVID-19 crisis.

Alcohol sales are tightly controlled by the OLCC, which imposes stringent rules on individuals and businesses before, during, and after alcohol purchases. When restaurants and bars had to close their doors to on-site service due to Oregon’s coronavirus response, the OLCC temporarily relaxed some rules regarding alcohol delivery. Because these rules are temporary, though, Oregonians’ easier access to wine and microbrews could once again be limited before this fall.

Recently, the OLCC has begun a process to make the temporary relaxation permanent. These changes would allow increased flexibility in how alcohol can be delivered to customers and increase the hours during which alcohol may be purchased. The changes raise the question of why such burdensome restrictions were imposed in the first place.

When Oregon has to close a door, we can open a window. Let’s keep economic freedom for Oregon businesses and customers at the forefront of Oregon’s rule-making process.

Vlad Yurlov is a Policy Analyst at Cascade Policy Institute, Oregon’s free-market public policy research organization.

By Paul Driessen

Why don’t African black lives and ecological values matter? or impacts in and beyond Virginia?

The US Supreme Court recently ruled 7-2 to reverse a lower court ruling that had invalidated a permit for the Atlantic Coast Pipeline, which will bring West Virginia natural gas to Virginia and North Carolina, for home heating, factory power, electricity generation and manufacturing petrochemical feedstocks.

Environmentalists had claimed the US Forest Service had no authority to issue the permit, because a 0.1-mile (530-foot) segment would cross 600 feet below the 2,200-mile-long Appalachian Trail, which is administered by the National Park Service. Justice Thomas’s majority opinion scuttled that assertion.

Pipeline project developers Dominion Resources and Duke Energy should receive the USFS and other permits relatively soon – and have the pipeline in operation by early 2022 – unless a Biden administration takes over in 2021 (with AOC as woke climate and energy advisor to Biden and Democrats) and imposes Green New Deal bans on drilling, fracking, pipelines, and eventually any use of natural gas, oil and coal. Continue reading

Cooper Conway

George Floyd’s tragic death has led to growing calls for changes to antiquated policing systems. The recent protests asking for police reform over these past few weeks have caused many families to question the systemic discrimination that is hardwired into the assignment of students to public schools.

Census data reports U.S. spending per student has nearly tripled since 1960—and that’s after accounting for inflation. Oregon now spends almost $15,000 per student per year. In Portland Public Schools, it’s $27,500 per student. Even so, Oregon ranks near the bottom of the states in graduation rates.

Despite this monumental increase in funding the government’s school system with no positive results to show, most Oregon students are assigned a school based on their street address. This isn’t an accident—it’s written into district policies. Kids from low-income neighborhoods are placed in low-income schools, while wealthy families have the option to move to neighborhoods with better schools. Continue reading

Archbishop Carlo Maria Vigano Photo credit: Wikipedia

Mr. President,

In recent months we have been witnessing the formation of two opposing sides that I would call Biblical: the children of light and the children of darkness. The children of light constitute the most conspicuous part of humanity, while the children of darkness represent an absolute minority. And yet the former are the object of a sort of discrimination which places them in a situation of moral inferiority with respect to their adversaries, who often hold strategic positions in government, in politics, in the economy and in the media. In an apparently inexplicable way, the good are held hostage by the wicked and by those who help them either out of self-interest or fearfulness.

These two sides, which have a Biblical nature, follow the clear separation between the offspring of the Woman and the offspring of the Serpent. On the one hand there are those who, although they have a thousand defects and weaknesses, are motivated by the desire to do good, to be honest, to raise a family, to engage in work, to give prosperity to their homeland, to help the needy, and, in obedience to the Law of God, to merit the Kingdom of Heaven. On the other hand, there are those who serve themselves, who do not hold any moral principles, who want to demolish the family and the nation, exploit workers to make themselves unduly wealthy, foment internal divisions and wars, and accumulate power and money: for them the fallacious illusion of temporal well-being will one day – if they do not repent – yield to the terrible fate that awaits them, far from God, in eternal damnation.

In society, Mr. President, these two opposing realities co-exist as eternal enemies, just as God and Satan are eternal enemies. And it appears that the children of darkness – whom we may easily identify with the deep state which you wisely oppose and which is fiercely waging war against you in these days Continue reading

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