The Northwest Connection

A Community Newspaper for the way we live

Kathryn Hickok

By Kathryn Hickok, Publications Director and Director of the Children’s Scholarship Fund-Portland program at Cascade Policy Institute

Your average high school students may not be able to explain a fictional company’s dividends to a lecture hall full of adults from the business world. But after five days at Young Entrepreneurs Business Week, they could.

YEBW is a nonprofit annual summer camp founded in 2005 by young Oregon entrepreneurs Nick and Maurissa Fisher, hosted on the campuses of the University of Portland, Oregon State University, and University of Oregon. From 75 students on one campus during its first year, YEBW has grown to more than 400 participants on three campuses in 2016.

YEBW’s founders shared a concern that young people of all educational and economic backgrounds often leave high school with no practical business knowledge, hindering their ability to innovate, create, and produce the kinds of goods and services key to Oregon communities’ growth and success. They sought to fill the gap by drawing together curriculum developers, business professionals, educators, and successful youth-focused program leaders to launch an innovative educational program for high school students. Continue reading

John A. Charles, Jr. is President and CEO of Cascade Policy Institute, Oregon’s free market public policy research organization

John A. Charles, Jr. is President and CEO of Cascade Policy Institute

Portland school superintendent Carole Smith announced her resignation this week after nine years on the job.

The next steps are predictable: The school board will conduct a national search for a successor and eventually sign someone to an expensive contract. After a short honeymoon, the new leader will sink into the bureaucratic quagmire and leave after a short and forgettable tenure.

Management experts know that if system results are disappointing, you need to change the system, not the people. The single most important change Portland could make would be to redesign how the money flows.

Right now, tax dollars go to school bureaucracies, regardless of results. Students are assigned to schools like widgets in a factory, and few families have a “Plan B” if they are unhappy. Continue reading

Students are learning energy and climate change advocacy, not climate science

David Legates, PhD, CCM, Professor of Climatology, University of Delaware in Newark, Delaware

David Legates, PhD, CCM, Professor of Climatology, University of Delaware

For almost thirty years, I have taught climate science at three different universities. What I have observed is that students are increasingly being fed climate change advocacy as a surrogate for becoming climate science literate. This makes them easy targets for the climate alarmism that pervades America today.

Earth’s climate probably is the most complicated non-living system one can study, because it naturally integrates astronomy, chemistry, physics, biology, geology, hydrology, oceanography and cryology, and also includes human behavior by both responding to and affecting human activities. Current concerns over climate change have further pushed climate science to the forefront of scientific inquiry.

What should we be teaching college students?

At the very least, a student should be able to identify and describe the basic processes that cause Earth’s climate to vary from poles to equator, from coasts to the center of continents, from the Dead Sea or Death Valley depression to the top of Mount Everest or Denali. Continue reading

Steven Lyazi is a student and day laborer in Kampala, Uganda.

By Steven Lyazi is a student and day laborer in Kampala, Uganda.

When will its leaders focus on vital issues affecting its people, instead of lining their pockets?

Africa is still battling “transitional periods,” from slavery and colonialism, to neocolonialism and eco-imperialism. Its wars, diseases and suffering will never end until we stop having greedy leaders who only care about their families, cronies and tribal members.

The continent has enough natural resources to bring peace, health and prosperity to nearly everyone. And yet 90% of Africans still lack electricity and basic necessities, while corrupt leaders who could help transform our nations embezzle billions and leave parents and children starving and poor. Continue reading

dollar_1If you haven’t seen this before, please take time to look at and study the dollar bill. It means much more than just something to spend.

On the rear of the One Dollar bill, you will see two circles. Together, they comprise the Great Seal of the United States. The First Continental Congress requested that Benjamin Franklin and a group of men come up with a Seal. It took four years to accomplish this task and another two years to get it approved.  Continue reading

“Sword of Common Sense! Our surest gift.” – George Meredith (1828-1909), “To the Comic Spirit”

“Foremost captain of his time; rich in saving common-sense.” – Tennyson (ode to the Duke of Wellington)

THE EMPEROR OF AUSTRIA, upon being informed of the death of the ambassador from Russia, said: “I wonder what his motive was.”
Sometimes smartly-dressed emperors have no clothes, considering common sense, simply because their words have no credibility. Sometimes the sexy info babes of the media have no clothes because they echo the words of the emperor: Continue reading

Air Force Academy cadets keep a giant American flag aloft during the Air Force-Brigham Young University halftime 9/11 memorial ceremony at Falcon Stadium near Colorado Springs, Colo., Sept. 11, 2010. The flag measured about 55 yards by 30 yards. (U.S. Air Force photo/Dennis Rogers)

Air Force Academy cadets keep a giant American flag aloft during the Air Force-Brigham Young University halftime 9/11 memorial ceremony at Falcon Stadium near Colorado Springs, Colo., Sept. 11, 2010. The flag measured about 55 yards by 30 yards. (U.S. Air Force photo/Dennis Rogers)

Frank Maguire, The Northwest Connection

Frank Maguire, The Northwest Connection

O beautiful for pilgrim feet whose stern impassioned stress; a thoroughfare of freedom beat across the wilderness! America, America! God mend they every flaw, confirm thy soul in self-control, thy liberty in law!”

I watched the Republican convention last night from beginning to end…on C-SPAN, absent the supercilious talking-heads.  I listened and watched REAL God-fearing, God-loving Americans speaking ACTUAL truth.  For the first time in years have I been so inspired by the good, decent, courageous people who still inhabit this nation.

My first look at Google this a.m. was disgusting.  Continue reading

Victoria Taft

Victoria Taft

Mike Strickland

Mike Strickland

Exactly one week ago on Monday, a Multnomah County judge found a man not guilty of doing the same thing a Portland reporter is alleged to have done on the streets of downtown Portland.

Monday, Mike Strickland will have his day in court as he asks for reduced bail in the case against him. Strickland has been charged with two felonies and two misdemeanors related to unholstering his gun as Black Lives Matter protesters charged him last week. Strickland was in fear of great bodily injury or worse.

See my previous stories about this case: www.victoriataft.com

Marlon and Karen Furtado

Marlon and Karen Furtado

There she was. The love of my life. Of course, we were only in the 2nd grade, but I knew she was the one. I ran up to her swing and kissed her. Oh, the heaven’s exploded. Sadly, it didn’t go anywhere. She picked one of the other boys who kissed her.

I decided I wanted a more mature woman anyway. So, when I was in the 5th grade, I set my eyes on Sandy, the beautiful 8th grader. She was taller than me, so a kiss wasn’t likely. But one morning as I passed my sister’s dresser, I saw her bracelet. Suddenly the entire plan came together. At recess I gave the bracelet to Lonnie, my fearless friend, with the instructions to tell Sandy it was from me. The rest of the day flew by, daydreaming at my desk of life with Sandy…until Continue reading

Pauli Bowlen

Pauli Bowlen

By Connie Warnock, The Northwest Connection

By Connie Warnock, The Northwest Connection

The other day, Pauli called me. She lives in Marysville, WA. Her husband Dave passed away a little over a year ago. It’s hard to think of them without each other. They were a perfect balancing act and our dearest friends.

We met showing dogs and decided it would be more fun to travel to the same shows in our motor homes. We did this for many years. Dave lived well into his 90’s and Pauli is now in her 80’s. Her last Pekingese dog died on Dave’s last birthday. To say we love them both is almost an understatement. Pauli can tell a joke like no other. And, Dave’s penchant for talking politics and riling up someone standing near was legendary. Continue reading

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